EDITORIAL: New Year, new resolution

What is the difference between a New Year’s resolution and a plain old-fashioned goal?

According to lore, it was ancient Babylonians who, 4,000 years ago, ushered in the new year making promises to the gods to repay debts and practice better behaviour for the coming year, believing favours and good fortune would be bestowed upon them.

Over three millennia later, is it the notion of repenting for bad behaviour that drives our tradition of resolutions for a new year, or is it a fancy way of saying, “I’d like to achieve something this year”?

To resolve something lends the idea that it needs to be fixed, or a solution found. To set forth down a planned path with the intent of reaching a desired result, denotes the beginning of a mission, however great or small.

We’re not sure when the two became one in the same, as seems to be the 21st Century idea behind the tradition.

Ask around and you’ll find Victorians who tell you they’re going to eat better this year, quit smoking, lose weight, finally try yoga or get on one of the city’s new bike paths. They’ll tell you they want to be more of something, or less of something else. Or they may not tell you anything at all, because only one in three Canadians set a New Year’s resolution, while a whopping 70 per cent of them fail, many by February.

Are those failures the result of the pressure that accompanies such a drastic timeline to change something about yourself?

What if, instead of setting New Year’s resolutions to keep up with the proverbial Jones’, we all just took a minute to be content with the achievements of 2017, however earth-shattering or minor they were.

We’re all growing, evolving and changing all the time and we don’t need a tradition to gauge our progress on it.

They say comparison can be the thief of joy – the one thing we could all do with a little more of.

So make a resolution not to make a New Year’s resolution – how’s that for a goal?

Just Posted

Parents grieving teen’s overdose death say it started with opioid prescription

Elliot Eurchuk, 16, died at his Oak Bay home Friday, after taking street drugs

Saanich homeowner feels harassed over unsightly premises dispute

Staff recommending council declare the items on Whiteside Road property be declared a nuisance

Indigenous leader shares traditional knowledge of B.C. plants for Earth Day

Guided walks through Beacon Hill Park provide insight to historical uses of Camas, Indian Plum, snow berries

Dix says B.C. remains focused on fighting youth overdoses in wake of teen’s death

Elliot Eurchuk’s parents say he died at his Oak Bay home after taking street drugs

Protecting farmland, but at what cost?

Some advocates want ALC rules to put farmers and food security first

Spring Home Show this weekend in Colwood

West Shore Parks and Recreation will be transformed to showcase everything home related

Royal baby: It’s a boy for Kate and William

The Duchess of Cambridge has given birth to her third child, a boy weighing 8 pounds, 7 ounces.

Trump says North Korea agreed to denuclearize. It hasn’t.

Trump is claiming that North Korea has agreed to “denuclearization” before his potential meeting with Kim, but that’s not the case.

Suspect in deadly Waffle House shooting still being sought

Police say Travis Reinking is the suspect in a shooting at a Waffle House restaurant Sunday in Nashville that left four people dead.

G7 warned of Russian threats to western democracy

Ukraine foreign minister Pavlo Klimkin warns G7 of Russian war against Western democracy

Scientist warns of declining biodiveristy in Saanich

Saanich residents can learn more about the local effects of climate change… Continue reading

LOCAL FLAVOUR: Taking the sting out of nourishing nettles

Linda Geggie For the Saanich News When you think of nettles you… Continue reading

Final week for ALR input

Public consultation process closes April 30

Most Read