Health Canada’s assertions questioned in cell tower story

Argument made for going the precautionary route with respect to cell phone coverage

Re: Residents worried about effect of cellphone antennas (News, June 22)

Health Canada’s assurance that, “the consensus of the scientific community is that RF energy from cellphone towers is too low to cause adverse health effects in humans” does not stand up to scientific scrutiny.

These kinds of statements will come back to haunt them.

First, there is no scientific consensus. Second, there is a growing body of evidence that the radiation from cell tower antennas is harmful – within 500 metres the increase of adverse effects is significant (Balmori, 2010).

Also in 2010 neurosurgeon Vini Khurana reported in the International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health that eight out of 10 published epidemiological studies showed increased adverse neurobehavioural symptoms or cancer in populations living within 500 metres of cell tower antennas.

Yes, this technology is everywhere, radiation emissions are within current government standards, and there are huge economic benefits – for now.

However, I suggest Kaye Melliship and other officials consider the long-term health costs and read the Seletun Scientific Statement and the 2011 World Health Organization (WHO) report classifying this radiation as “possibly carcinogenic” and that they prepare themselves to answer these vital questions:

– What levels of microwave radiation are these residents being exposed to? Presumably there is also WiFi in the building and Smart Meters nearby.

– Is anyone monitoring these people for adverse effects?

– Are you willing to give your personal assurance that there is no cause for concern?

– Have you taken into consideration the future costs of health-related litigation?

In Europe many areas are adopting the precautionary principle and going for safe options – fibre optics and wired Internet access.

Kerry Crofton

Oak Bay

Just Posted

Public warned of night firing exercises in Saanich after evidence of trespassing

Routine shooting practice to take place at Heals Range from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Saturday, Sunday

Riders roll to help Island hospices

$240,000 raised so far for this weekend’s seventh annual Cycle of Life Tour

Westin Bear Mountain hotel sold to local businessman and entrepreneur

Ecoasis will maintain responsibility of golf and tennis operations and developable lands

Motorcylist ticketed for excessive speed, bike impounded by Saanich Police

The 22-year-old was issued two tickets – one for a bent licence plate

Concrete beams for McKenzie interchange set for installation this weekend

No lane closures expected during weekend work, says ministry

Rich the Vegan scoots across Canada for the animals

Rich Adams is riding his push scooter across Canada to bring awareness to the dog meat trade in Asia

POLL: Do you carry reusable shopping bags?

While a court ruling determined the City of Victoria’s plastic bag ban… Continue reading

Greater Victoria wanted list for the week of July 16

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

Couple found dead along northern B.C. highway in double homicide

Woman from the U.S. and man from Australia found dead near Liard Hot Springs

Injured fawn at B.C. vet will be euthanized Friday night unless claimed by sanctuary

Gilbert the deer is currently being treated at West Kelowna’s Rose Valley Veterinary Hospital

BC Wildfire Service warns wet weather no reason to be complacent

Fire risk currently low for much of B.C. compared to same time over last two years.

Bank of Canada lowers qualifying rate used in mortgage stress tests

Home sales softened last year after the federal government introduced new stress test rules for uninsured mortgages

Port Hardy RCMP cleared in arrest that left man with broken ribs, punctured lung: IIO

The IIO noted the matter will not be referred to crown counsel for consideration of charges.

B.C. man pleads guilty in snake venom death of toddler

Plea comes more than five years after the incident in North Vancouver

Most Read