Traffic jams will only get worse and worse as major arteries remain the same, number of vehicles grow every year. (File photo)

Infrastructure improvements not fast enough

McKenzie interchange, Blue Water Bridge, among many others are moving at a snail’s pace. Why?

Some say there are two seasons in Canada: winter and construction. But what if, in fact, there are three? Winter, construction, and the numbingly- slow progress of infrastructure improvements trickling from the province.

Unfortunately, the last one is year-long. Every year. Seemingly for all eternity.

The McKenzie interchange is the perfect example of laziness, one that’s on display for us all to see every day by the side of the road, passing by mounds of shattered rock, dust, and bare, half-finished foundations. Recent news of its completion weren’t great either, as a new contractor switchover means the infamous interchange won’t likely be done until 2019.

Is that all $89 million buys us nowadays? 2019? And that’s being optimistic.

So this begs the question: if a 25-storey condominium takes six months to a year to complete from a muddy chasm in the ground to the tip, why does it take several years to build a basic interchange? Which, by the way, may be totally useless by 2019, since Victoria’s traffic woes and amount of wheels on roads would have likely doubled.

Then you have the rest of Greater Victoria, which sees tens of thousands of vehicles squeeze their way through narrow, potholed inter-urban roads daily, or, our personal favourite, Johnson Street Bridge and its long-promised successor that we’ll see finished, maybe some sunny day.

The Transportation Ministry are trying. Kind of. Patches of roads are being rebuilt across the region, with delineation projects and improved lighting appearing all over, even as far as Sooke. Commendable efforts, yet still short-handed with current demand.

So what is it then? Manpower? Equipment? Let’s not kid ourselves, you can summon all the cement and dump trucks in the world and find skilled tradespeople driven and willing to get the job done. But like always, money talks. It’s easier to wrap everything in red tape and push things at a snail’s pace because it takes little to no responsibility for those in charge. The rest of us sit in traffic, fighting like rabid animals for a metre of lane space.

Victoria is on the brink of the biggest infrastructure crisis in its existence, so the time to act is now, not tomorrow, not next year. Find the right people for the job, utilize every dime to its full potential and get those tracks moving.

Or maybe hope Blade Runner was right about flying cars in 2019.

octavian.lacatusu@oakbaynews.com

Just Posted

VicPD officers hurt in separate weekend incidents

Both altercations involved aggressive individuals encountered by police

Material spill slows traffic on Highway 1 near Victoria

You may experience heavier traffic than normal if you’re headed from Victoria… Continue reading

Pumpkin Lady carves Halloween niche

Sooke artist puts new spin on jack-o-lanterns

Victoria couple hope unmanned boat drone becomes first to cross Atlantic

Colin and Julie Angus, UVic scientists to have drone collect environmental data en route

Saanich crash victim leaves behind pregnant wife and young son

The death of a Saanich man has left behind a grieving widow,… Continue reading

Flu could see greater transmission in 2017

Health asking the public to get their flu vaccinations leading into a flu season that could start early and affect many in 2017.

B.C. NDP convention set for Victoria

Premier, federal leader Jagmeet Singh to add energy

Silver Creek farm search expands north

RCMP were seen collecting evidence three kilometres north of the farm where human remains were found

Flu could see greater transmission in 2017

Health asking the public to get their flu vaccinations leading into a flu season that could start early and affect many in 2017.

Nanaimo man assaulted, tied up and robbed at his home

Incident occurred about 7 a.m. Monday, Oct. 23 at a home on Beverly Drive

B.C. school trustee calls LGBTQ school program ‘weapon of propaganda’

Chilliwack’s Barry Neufeld published the comments on his Facebook page

B.C. casino accused of illegal activity follows rules: operator

B.C. had launched review after concerns about money laundering at River Rock casino in Richmond

Opponents of LGBTQ program to file human rights complaint against Surrey School District

District denied Parents United Canada right to rent Bell Performing Arts Centre for rally next month

Red hot Vikes women to host playoff opener

UVic Vikes This Week: basketball season kicks off at home

Most Read