LETTER: Clearing up sewage issue

The Seaterra Commission will implement whichever plan ultimately the CRD and the province approve

I would like to respond to a few points made in a recent letter to the editor on Oct. 3 entitled, Public deserves to be consulted.

This letter states that the Capital Regional District did not consult the public when it came up with the current, approved wastewater treatment plan.

In fact, the CRD spent more than 10 years consulting the public throughout the region on a sewage treatment plan.

It was this consultation which led the CRD to develop the wastewater treatment plan that was approved by the province.

Whether the plan is implemented, it is a cost effective and environmentally sound plan which exceeds federal and provincial regulations and meets the long-term needs of our region.

The approved treatment plant provides capacity for the region until well into 2065 for a unit capacity cost that is significantly lower than the rate of other comparable plants.

The letter implies that the planned 18-kilometre residual solids conveyance pipe would be costly to maintain and expensive to operate due to pumping costs. The truth is there are already hundreds of kilometres of conveyance pipes currently underground throughout the region. This conveyance pipe would be no different and the costs for the pumping would be approximately $55,000 per year. By locating the Resource Recovery Center at Hartland the CRD is able to utilize approximately $2 million per year of landfill gas in the process. When compared to the $55,000 per year to pump the residual solids to Hartland this resource recovery provides significant savings to the CRD.

The letter states the treatment plant uses old technology, doesn’t address pharmaceuticals in our wastewater and has limited energy recovery potential. This is simply not the case.

The program was not developed to address storm water infiltration as this is being done at the  municipal level as part of their infrastructure planning.

Should the plan be abandoned, the CRD will work closely with municipalities to develop a different approach and public consultation would certainly be part of that initiative.

The Seaterra Commission will implement whichever plan ultimately the CRD and the province approve and the taxpayers of the core area are willing to pay for.

Albert Sweetnam, program director, Seaterra Program

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Saanich Peninsula steps into post-pandemic phase

Pending partial re-opening of local schools signals new start

Craft vendors allowed to re-join Goldstream Farmers Market

Dr. Bonnie Henry lightens restrictions, approves non-food items to be sold

Three people sent to hospital following serious crash in View Royal

Incident involved a motorcycle and one vehicle on Sunday afternoon

Province recognizes three Greater Victoria residents for work to combat racism

The three residents were recognized during the Multiculturalism and Anti-Racism Awards

Saanich high school student wins free educational trip through Europe

Beaverbrook Vimy Prize centers on First, Second World War history

VIDEO: Injured bald eagle rescued in B.C. First Nations community

Bird suspected injured in fight, whisked off to Coquitlam rehab

Toronto Raptors’ Ujiri says conversations about racism can no longer be avoided

Thousands have protested Floyd’s death and repeated police killings of black men across the United States

B.C.’s Central Kootenay region declares state of emergency, issues evacuation orders

The evacuation alert covers all areas except the Cities of Castelgar and Nelson

‘I’m afraid’: Witnesses of wolf attack on senior near Prince Rupert worried about safety

Frank Russ shows where the unprovoked wolf attacked his father

Protesters prepare to rally against racism in front of Vancouver Art Gallery

Rally is in response to the deaths of black Americans and a Toronto woman

Man dies in ATV accident south of Nanaimo

Incident happened on backroad Friday night in Nanaimo Lakes area

Protesters rally against anti-black, Indigenous racism in Toronto

Police estimated the crowd to be between 3,500 and 4,000 and said there was no violence

Feds earmark $1.5M to support recovery of B.C., Indigenous tourism

B.C. money will be split between Vancouver Island and Indigenous tourism

‘We’re sick of it’: Anger over police killings shatters U.S.

Tens of thousands marched to protest the death of George Floyd

Most Read