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LETTER: Frontline workers helping us cope with COVID

Moving though this time of doom and gloom, the COVID-19 virus is affecting us all, catching it has made people fearful and weary. Stores are closing and folk’s livelihoods and jobs are disappearing due to this invisible menace.

Important festive gatherings and celebrations have to be cancelled due to possible transmission of this virulent micro-organism. The ability to meet in a family group or with friends binds us together and sustains us as humans while maintaining crucial mental health; depression and anxiety have spiraled upwards, adding to already stressful times.

What Dr. Bonnie Henry and her medical team is telling us is not intended to make our lives more tedious – but rules on how we can survive and live though this pandemic.

People maintaining the front lines, medical staff, firefighters, paramedics, and thousands like them, place their lives in harm’s way purposely in order that others do not die. Let us not make their jobs more arduous by ignoring the guidelines set out by Dr. Henry.

We have just passed Nov. 11, Remembrance Day. Many of us lost loved ones, those who gave their lives in battle so others who came after could live in peace and without tyranny.

At this time we are again at war, not a conventional one because our adversary is invisible, except under a microscope. This enemy can wipe us out; it has ensnared every country on this planet. If we do not heed the warnings, wear masks, social distance, and avoid large gatherings, be prepared for the consequences.

In closing, this letter was supposed to be in recognition of frontline workers; those who keep our stores operating, and the shelves full, the cashiers who literally face contamination up front and personal. At the Saanichton Thrifty’s Food works a cashier named Darlene: what a tonic she is; always pleasant and helpful as she scans and loads your shopping while singing ‘70s pop songs; brown haired and brown eyes and a sweet relaxing voice. Even if you feel down and crabby, within seconds, she can lift your spirits and mood with her sparkling attitude.

Thank you to all the countless Darlenes out there who are helping us to get though this very abnormal year.

Margaret J. Jestico

Saanichton