LETTER: So far, all parties fail to address real Canadian problems this election campaign

Send your letters to editor@vicnews.com

With just under two weeks to go, perhaps this election will surprise us yet, but on present form election 2019 will conclude as the most pandering and multi-partisan misdirection – since the last one. As candidates continue their enthusiastic hunt for the elusive species, the undecided voter, I don’t think this is contestable.

The platforms parties have put on display range from unenterprising (camping passes, anyone?) of the Conservatives and Liberals to the spend-happy-handouts of the NDP and Greens. With a growing consensus that the latter, be discounted as the fantasies of the unelectable, and the former scarcely taken seriously – with records of broken promises from both parties. As parties redirect questions of “what will you do in power” to fear-mongering what their opponents will do – Canadians are left a choice that continues to grow unclear.

The most recent Leaders Debate (English) – “debate” being used loosely – was a clear indicator that the parties seem unable to tell the truth even about their most recent past.

The Liberals have gravely failed to make any case for their re-election, while the Conservatives have made no case as to why they should replace them. With all parties failing to touch on real concerns for Canadians – economic stability, foreign affairs (China, Trump, Brexit, India – where will Canada be in the next four years?), opioid crisis, population aging, money laundering, affordability and the list goes on. Real problems that require significant changes in economic policy (slash marginal tax rates), health care (tackling the mental health issues, stopping China’s fentanyl from entering the country, aging population etc.) and opening industries to competition (cell phone providers, airlines etc.). Not a single word on how a party plans to make these changes – if they even would.

With each party running on “why you shouldn’t choose the others” campaign it is easy to see why Canadians are find themselves undecided. Driving through communities you can see the lack of campaign signs – we are simply not engaged or not wanting to affiliate ourselves with any-one party. Our growing disinterest with politics has only allowed for this complete miserable, dishonest, pandering and multi-partisan misdirection.

Darren Francis

Victoria

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

PHOTOS: A morning in a physically-distanced Victoria

Residents commute in a pandemic-changed city

North Saanich residents to comment on library plans

Public hearing scheduled for Monday

‘Someone knows something’: a look into Vancouver Island missing persons with interactive map

There are more than three dozen people listed as missing throughout Vancouver Island

Summer program helps Greater Victoria teens sharpen writing skills

Registration for the program runs until Aug. 17

Saanich bylaw sparks EV charging infrastructure requirements in new builds

All new developments to be EV-charger compatible starting Sept. 1

QUIZ: Are you ready for a summer road trip?

How much do you really know about roads, motor vehicles and car culture? Take this quiz to find out.

Beverly Hills 90210 star’s family selling Vancouver Island Beach Resort

You can own Jason Priestley’s Terrace Beach Resort in Ucluelet for less than $5 million

Genetic detectives begin work to trace spread of COVID-19 in Canada

The kinds of genetic technology being used for this project did not exist when SARS hit Canada in 2003

Sports fishers protest Fraser River Chinook closures

Public Fishery Alliance wants hatchery fish open for harvest

B.C. Ferries increasing passenger capacity after COVID-19 restrictions

Transport Canada 50-per-cent limit being phased out, no current plans to provide masks

Shellfish industry get funds to clean up at Island sites and beyond

Businesses can apply to cover half of costs to clean up so-called ‘ghost gear’

Amber Alert for two Quebec girls cancelled after bodies found

Romy Carpentier, 6, Norah Carpentier, 11, and their father, Martin Carpentier, missing since Wednesday

B.C. man prepares to be first to receive double-hand transplant in Canada

After the surgery, transplant patients face a long recovery

Grocers appear before MPs to explain decision to cut pandemic pay

Executives from three of Canada’s largest grocery chains have defended their decision to end temporary wage increases

Most Read