LETTER: Teachers dealing with a government that dismisses rule of law

Teachers do not take strike action lightly, and strike is about standing up for students, says reader

Re: Year-end teachers strike hurts kids, News, June 18

In response to your article, “Year-end strike-not about the kids,” I take exception to your comments.

This article suggests that teachers are being unethical by “exerting maximum pressure” on the government and this impacts students negatively.

Teachers do not take strike action lightly, but they are facing a government that has consistently breached both constitutional and international laws designed to protect workers’ collective bargaining rights. The B.C. Supreme Court has ruled that this government has stripped away the teachers rights to bargain class size composition and even strategized to push teachers toward a strike.

When faced with a government that does not negotiate in good faith, after months of negotiations, the last resort is to go on a full scale strike.

I work in the school system and my son is in Grade 12. Sure, there were a few inconveniences and my son may have to wait for his marks. It is a small price to pay in support of what teachers do in the classroom for my child everyday. It is time to look at the bigger picture. There is something wrong with this, so-called democracy, when unions are not able to negotiate working conditions (class size composition).  Also, providing better working condition means students get a better education.

There is no “self serving spitting contest” as you state. Teachers are trying to have a voice and stand up for the rights of students. They are facing a government that chooses to ignore the law. I shudder to think that if class size composition is left in the hands of this current government, what will become of public education. When making decisions based solely on the bottom line school children will definitely pay the price. By the way, who is responsible for docking government’s outrageous wages when they fail to do their job?

Adele O’Neill

Saanich

 

Just Posted

Cyclists and drivers take to the streets Wednesday morning in first official Bike to Work Week celebration

The 25th annual Greater Victoria Bike to Work Week kicks off the followingMonday, May 27

High of 21 C for Wednesday

Plus your weekend forecast

Rickter Scale: Testing that time of our lives

Rick Stiebel is a semi-retired local journalist

Saanich lifeguards earn Vital Link awards for cardiac arrest response

Awards from BC Emergency Health Services recognize quick and skillful life-saving

Art and fashion collide for a cause at the Union Club of Victoria

May 26 event benefits Art Gallery of Greater Victoria exhibitions and educational programs

Greater Victoria wanted list for the week of May 21

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

POLL: Were you satisfied with the Game of Thrones series finale?

Millions gathered in front of their televisions Sunday night to watch the… Continue reading

Crackdown on money laundering does not include federal public inquiry: minister

An independent report commissioned concluded $7.4 billion was laundered in B.C. last year

Trudeau’s action plan on climate change brings B.C. politician out of retirement

Terry Lake, a former B.C. health minister, is running for federal office in Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo

Survey finds minimal progress in Canadian military’s fight against sexual misconduct

1.6 per cent of regular-force members — 900 military personnel — reported having been victims of sexual assaults over past year

Thetis housing project clouded by confusion

View Royal mayor clarifies details about Capital Region Housing Corporation project

Raptors beat Bucks 120-102 to even series at 2-2

Lowry pours in 25 as Toronto moves within two games of NBA Finals

Body of missing snowmobiler recovered from Great Slave Lake

Police confirm the body is that of one of three missing snowmobilers

Most Read