Making a scene at checkout counter shows lack of compassion

Store staff feel proud to support Greater Victoria charities

Re: Stores exist to sell goods, not collect for charity (Letters, March 14)

I feel very sad for the writer of this letter: something has gone very wrong.

This person is angry that she has to take the two seconds to say, “no thank you” to a cashier when asked for a charitable donation. This brief moment in time is so important to her that she does not care that the money received from those who wish to give is life-changing for someone.

I work at a grocery store in Esquimalt and a couple times of year we ask for donations. I am very proud of this, as it gives 100 per cent of donations to the charity and the contributions are used locally. I believe last year a local boy’s family was given a wheelchair-accessible van to help transport him.

Some people have special causes they donate to and some can not afford to give. We do not pressure anyone and we definitely do not deserve to be treated rudely.

The writer boasted about creating a scene at a store and leaving her groceries, promising not to return until the store “was back in the business of selling merchandise, rather than panhandling for charity.” I’m sure the other customers in line were less impressed with her than she believes and honestly, I’m sure that store does not wish to have her back.

People, please think before you act. One day it could be you that needs a helping hand.

Briar Butterfield

Langford