Oak Bay letter: New OCP may be a developers dream

Given council’s reckless densification proposals, they need to explain how they think they will protect existing residents’ privacy

The new Official Community Plan (OCP) draft reads like a developer’s wish list with all the expansion propaganda clichés included.

Given council’s reckless densification proposals, they need to explain how they think they will protect existing residents’ privacy, views and sunlight from these over-developments. They must also explain how their excessive densification plans will maintain Oak Bay’s character. I don’t believe residents understand exactly what zoning policies of this magnitude will mean, what the real impacts will be, and how this will affect everyone.

This OCP development document will open the floodgates to ad hoc, unplanned development and there will be no way to control it – or our growth as a community. The one per cent annual growth figure is particularly deceitful and deliberately misleading. How, for instance, would you restrict the number of applications for duplexes or laneway housing? How would you limit the number of large houses being divided into apartments? Would council tell some owners they can develop and exclude others? The same negative impacts on neighbours by allowing monster houses will occur – only in much larger proportions.

Additionally, no more amenities will be provided to serve the new population – instead new and existing residents will pay increased user fees to contain use of the existing facilities. As we know, basement suites do not pay their way and there is no way, given Oak Bay’s budget and staffing limits, to enforce regulation. If there were, every municipality would do so. Throw in the illegal laneway housing, triplexes, 300 square foot units, etc. and taxes will have to be raised accordingly.

 

Council’s next step will be to hurriedly change our zoning bylaw to reflect these OCP extensive densification objectives – opening Oak Bay up to rapid marketing of inappropriate, unwanted change. These development initiatives will significantly increase traffic, parked cars, commuters, illegal suites and other structures, noise, service cuts and also substantially increase taxes. All other communities that have introduced these OCP development objectives have experienced these impacts. It has been proven time and time again this type of densification does not lead to prosperity, instead it increases municipal budgets and lowers living standards.

 

 

Just Posted

Third rink needed immediately at Pearkes, say users

Only four ice pads for Saanich, Victoria groups

City of Victoria looks for emergency shelter options amidst bed shortage

My Place considered for tier-2 shelter during harsh weather

B.C. historian helped Viola Desmond make it on the $10 bill

Merna Forster of Oak Bay petitioned for years for a Canadian woman to be honoured on currency

Vikes ready for Queen’s in Game 1 of national men’s rugby championship

From mid-terms to national championships, it’s a rugby life

Algae bloom at Elk Lake prompts CRD advisory notice

Reappearance of blue-green algae lethal to dogs a constant concern for water quality

VIDEO: B.C. legislature clerk, sergeant at arms suspended for criminal investigation

Clerk of the House Craig James, Sergeant-at-arms Gary Lenz on administrative leave

Good Food Summit plants seeds for food security

The Good Food Summit runs Nov. 22 and 23

POLL: Have you started your Christmas shopping yet?

The Christmas lights are twinkling and holiday music is playing in local… Continue reading

Trial: Witness describes encounter with accused murderer while tending to fatally injured Descoteau

Wright said he was working in his yard when he heard a woman screaming.

Former NHL player and coach Dan Maloney dies at 68

Maloney coached the Toronto Maple Leafs and Winnipeg Jets

Ex-MSU president charged with lying to police about Nassar

Lou Anna Simon was charged Tuesday with lying to police during an investigation

Police aim to prevent retaliation after Hells Angel found dead under B.C. bridge

IHIT confirms Chad Wilson, 43, was the victim of a ‘targeted’ homicide

Otter makes a snack out of koi fish in Vancouver Chinese garden

Staff say the otter has eaten at least five fish

Police looking into two more incidents at private Toronto all-boys’ school

Police and the school have said two of the prior incidents involved an alleged sexual assault

Most Read