Prime Minister Justin Trudeau leaving the Trans Mountain pipeline’s Indigenous Advisory and Monitoring Committee meeting on the Cheam reserve in Chilliwack on June 5, 2018. (Paul Henderson/ The Progress)

OPINION: Trudeau’s media snub in the Fraser Valley

Shouldn’t the PM be obliged to speak to members of a community he visits, at least via the media?

It’s a rare thing for a community of our size to get a visit from a Prime Minister.

So when we learned Justin Trudeau was coming to town, we cleared the decks, so to speak, to ensure we could cover his visit as closely as possible.

After a delayed arrival shrouded in heavy security, a short and secretive meeting excluding the public or the media, he whisked away without saying a word.

Nothing more than a toothy smile and a wave with his shirt-sleeve-rolled-up arm.

The question that immediately occurred to me as the door to the black Cadillac closed was: Does the democratically elected leader of our country not have some obligation to speak directly or at least indirectly to the people in a community he visits?

He can’t talk to everyone. He can’t be everywhere. He can’t even visit everywhere. It’s a big country. There’s a lot of us.

But that’s what the media is there for, to serve as a proxy for the public who have questions for him about, for example, using public funds to purchase a pipeline from a private company.

And other stuff, too.

I arrived at the Cheam reserve Tuesday to intense security. Police cars up on Highway 9. A pickup full of Mounties in full ERT gear atop the Cheam landfill.

Down at the Multiplex, literally dozens of cars parked out back for the dozens of police officers fulfilling various roles on scene.

Members of the media – TV, radio and print – were led into a boardroom, gear put on the floor so a German shepherd from the RCMP’s Police Dog Services could have a sniff.

Then, door shut, we waited, not allowed out until Trudeau arrived.

But before that, a group of protesters with signs walked down the road to the hall. There we were, like goldfish in a bowl, as the protesters gave speeches leaving us to film, photograph, and record from behind glass.

Then, finally, “his” arrival. But still we are trapped in that room, taking awkward photographs through angled glass with his back to us as he waves to protesters, corralled on the other side of the entrance.

Finally led to the main hall, cameras set up, Chief Ernie Crey makes some opening remarks, opening prayer from Pastor Andrew Victor, then Trudeau speaks.

Great, this is what we waited for…. exactly four minutes and 39 seconds of just what you’d expect Justin Trudeau to say on a reserve about a contentious issue: “collaboration,” “shared path,” “reconciliation,” “engagement,” “partnerships,” et cetera.

Then? Media kicked out so the committee can meet in private.

After, we milled about outside. About 10 members of the media, 40 protesters and as many police. We listening to aggrieved voices, scrummed with outspoken activists, and waited for Trudeau to come out and say a few words.

And then, that smile, that wave. Poof. He was gone.

For security purposes it’s a well oiled machine these Prime-Ministerial visits. It served a political purpose as he talks with Indigenous leaders, some opposed some in favour of the pipeline.

But with the public’s proxy ignored completely, I felt the visit missed something important.

Left to hear nothing directly from the Prime Minister, the media had little to share with the Canadian public.

Was that the point?

Maybe I’m naive – little ol’ community reporter that I am – but hungry for a good story with the leader of our country in town, I didn’t expect a one-on-one or even anything too meaty.

But he could have at least tossed us a bone.

• READ MORE: SLIDESHOW: Photos from Justin Trudeau’s brief visit to Chilliwack


@PeeJayAitch
paul.henderson@theprogress.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Horses from Victoria Carriage Tours involved in second incident in three months

Witnesses: Horses veered into a parked vehicle, smashing windows, climbing onto roof with front hooves

Stolen Search and Rescue dog harness replaced by donation

Moxxii’s specialized harness was stolen at the Pet-A-Palooza festival

Seaplane flights cancelled between Victoria and Vancouver due to smoke

Harbour Air has grounded flights travelling through the Georgia Strait

First stores open in Victoria’s expanded Mayfair shopping centre

Construction project will add about 100,000 square feet of retail space and 400 parking stalls

Smoke from wildfires delivers jolt to Greater Victoria air quality

Online map collects air quality from home monitors

PHOTOS: Puppy love makes a splash at St. Ann’s Academy

Puppies stampede, dive and do yoga at Victoria’s largest outdoor pet festival

Former Trump aide Paul Manafort found guilty of eight charges

A mistrial has been declared for the other 10 charges against him

Canada’s team chasing elusive gold medal at women’s baseball World Cup

Canada, ranked No. 2 behind Japan, opens play Wednesday against No. 10 Hong Kong

Former B.C. detective gets 20 months in jail for kissing teen witnesses

James Fisher, formerly with Vancouver police department, pleaded guilty to three charges in June

Former B.C. premier Christy Clark criticizes feds for buying pipeline

The $4.5 billion purchase of Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline second worst decision, she said

New B.C. Hydro electric car chargers launch on Vancouver Island

Fast-chargers to reduce ‘range anxiety’ for B.C. electric car drivers

‘Takes more courage to fail’: B.C. ultra-marathon swimmer reflects on cancelled try at record

Susan Simmons halted her swim from Victoria to Port Angeles and back because of hypothermia

Animals moved from B.C. Interior shelters to make way for pets displaced by wildfires

The Maple Ridge SPCA houses animals to make space for pets evacuated from B.C.’s burning interior.

$21.5 million medical pot plant to be built in B.C.

The facility is to be built in Princeton

Most Read