Our View: Recycling changes a welcome move

Since the beginning of the Blue Box program, the onus has been on consumers to recycle.

Whether that meant filling up your bin every other week with unwanted paper and cardboard, cans and glass, or taking items to the landfill for appropriate disposal, industry has been largely off the hook for its part in the creation of excess.

Since the beginning of the Blue Box program, the onus has been on consumers to recycle.

Whether that meant filling up your bin every other week with unwanted paper and cardboard, cans and glass, or taking items to the landfill for appropriate disposal, industry has been largely off the hook for its part in the creation of excess.

With the provincial government’s move to eventually force industry to plan for the end use of its products and packaging materials, it may force companies to change the way they market and distribute their goods.

Packaging is created as much to enhance visibility in retail stores as for practical purposes. But overpackaging, particularly with small items that get hung on racks, has been a problem for years. Getting rid of the cardboard part is easy, but how many people take the time to properly dispose of the plastic?

Putting the onus on producers to change the way they present products will no doubt require a major sea change. Many of our fancily packaged goods come from companies that chose a long time ago to cut costs by moving production facilities to Asia.

Nonetheless, the time is coming for manufacturers and retailers to take responsibility for what they put into the environment and think seriously about where their products will end up.

It’s time for some innovative packaging ideas to come to the forefront. Better still, why not have the government create financial incentives for companies that go the extra mile, or for innovative and entrepreneurial alternatives to the status quo?

We can’t grumble when any extra costs related to packaging or packing products differently are passed along to the end user. Since we’re all part of the problem, we need to look at it as a consumer tax of sorts.

Regardless what form this industry-led system takes, the public won’t be completely off the hook. We’ll still have to keep up our habit of separating materials for recycling. Getting help in that regard from industry can only help speed up the process of slowing down our environmental impact.

– Vic News

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Peninsula farm stands open for business with COVID-19 restrictions

Growers hopeful shoppers will support local farms

Income tax deadline looming

2019 individual tax returns are due June 1, June 15 for self-employed individuals

Langford’s City Centre Park cautiously reopens most activities as of Friday

Ice rink, bowling alley and restaurant to follow new regulations

VIDEO: Langford man battling cancer honored with hot rod, motorcycle procession

Friends and family support Patrick O’Hara on his 73rd birthday

‘Seven baths in two days’: Homeless adjusting to life in hotels

Victoria passes motion to allow camping 24-7 in parks until June 25

B.C. legislature coming back June 22 as COVID-19 emergency hits record

Pandemic restrictions now longer than 2017 wildfire emergency

POLL: Do you agree with the provincial government’s decision to increase the minimum wage?

B.C.’s lowest-paid workers will be getting a few more dollars to try… Continue reading

B.C.’s essential grocery, hardware store employees should get pandemic pay: retail group

Only B.C.’s social, health and corrections workers are eligible for top-ups

Edmonton, Vancouver and Toronto vying to be NHL hubs, but there’s a catch

The NHL unveiled a return-to-play plan that would feature 24 teams

As SD84 schools look to reopen, Kyuquot and Zeballos opt out

Schools in Tahsis and Gold River will open on June 1, with 30 per cent students expected to come in

B.C. sees 9 new COVID-19 cases, one death as officials watch for new cases amid Phase Two

Number of confirmed active cases is at 244, with 37 people in hospital

Illicit-drug deaths up in B.C. and remain highest in Canada: chief coroner

More than 4,700 people have died of overdoses since B.C. declared a public health emergency in early 2016

CMHC sees declines in home prices, sales, starts that will linger to end of 2022

CMHC said average housing prices could fall anywhere from nine to 18 per cent in its forecast

B.C. Paralympian named to Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame

Three-time world and Paralympic gold medalist Sonja Gaudet is part of 11-member class

Most Read