Photo during the twinning of a previous section of the Trans Mountain pipeline near Jasper, Alta. One reader doubts that fossil fuels have much of a long-term future in Canada. Kinder Morgan Canada photo

Photo during the twinning of a previous section of the Trans Mountain pipeline near Jasper, Alta. One reader doubts that fossil fuels have much of a long-term future in Canada. Kinder Morgan Canada photo

Renewable energies gaining ground on fossil fuels

World of electrical power generation is rapidly changing, reader writes

Re: History has a lesson for Trudeau, Notley on pipeline issue (Letters, July 19)

Ian MacDonell writes to remind us of Canadian political history from more than four decades ago, in his efforts to question whether the Trans Mountain pipeline will be supported going into the future.

We have ample examples and sound economic reasoning to know that it, as well as other fossil fuel projects, have no future. Analysis is concluding renewables are cheaper than fossil fuels now and investors are responding by pulling out of many of Canada’s energy sector projects.

A recent report from the National Energy Board concludes Canada got into the liquid natural gas game too late. Recently, Volvo announced it will no longer be offering gasoline powered vehicles in just a year and a half, with the auto industry openly transitioning to electric power. Last month, electric car company Tesla surpassed Ford, GM and most other major car companies to become the world’s fourth most valuable car company.

Today, a variety of on-site electrical generation options exist, from the built-in solar roof tiles and in-home storage offered for residences, to zero-emission generators used by hospitals, factories and major international corporations. Even huge centralized power projects like the Site C dam can now no longer be justified on economic terms alone. Those billions are better spent on the new energy infrastructure.

Looking to past political postures and pandering to the workers of dying resource industries in no way serves the residents of B.C., Alberta or Canada in the rapidly changing world of electrical power generation. Decision makers need to face the new world and help Canada be part of it.

Tyler Ahlgren

Victoria

Trans Mountain pipeline