Scooter use requires some thought

As we age, independence becomes more precious. We notice our bodies and minds are not as supple and reactive as once they were.

I am reluctant to wade into the debate about regulation of motorized scooters.

As a senior person, the road looms ahead in a few years, when my options could involve a vehicle that does not have four tires on the road and a round wheel to steer with.

As we age, independence becomes more precious. We notice our bodies and minds are not as supple and reactive as once they were. This can be troublesome.

Unhappily, seniors can lose their driver’s licence due to an inability to concentrate or to side effects of medication that cloud their judgment. Many factors come into play.

On Tuesday, Sept. 24, as I waited for the lights to change at Mt. Newton and the highway, heading west. I was shocked to see a motorized scooter darting up beside me. This elderly gentleman was among trucks, cars and cyclists.

He sped across the intersection and up Mount Newton X Road. Vehicles pulled way out to the center line to give him extra space.

People, principally older folk, need and want to keep that last vestige of autonomy, as long as possible. Individuals are entitled to courtesy and not to be treated with indifference.

I do not have the answer to this conundrum as it will require a person with a higher IQ than I have.

Still, I believe some regulation is needed for motorized scooters.

Safety is a priority. But any conclusions should take into account the personal impact they might have on older peoples lifestyles and their ability to get around.

Margaret J. Jestico

Central Saanich