PHOTOS: Large crowd gathers in Sooke on National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

Monique Pat, a member of the T’Sou-ke Nation, emcees the National Day of Truth and Reconciliation ceremony in Sooke on Sept. 30. Pat’s mother is a residential school survivor. (Kevin Laird - Sooke News Mirror)Monique Pat, a member of the T’Sou-ke Nation, emcees the National Day of Truth and Reconciliation ceremony in Sooke on Sept. 30. Pat’s mother is a residential school survivor. (Kevin Laird - Sooke News Mirror)
More than 200 people took part in a National Day of Truth and Reconciliation ceremony in Sooke on Sept. 29. (Kevin Laird - Sooke News Mirror)More than 200 people took part in a National Day of Truth and Reconciliation ceremony in Sooke on Sept. 29. (Kevin Laird - Sooke News Mirror)
Elizabeth Peters gives a testimonial at the National Day of Truth and Reconciliation ceremony in Sooke on Sept. 30. (Kevin Laird - Sooke News Mirror)Elizabeth Peters gives a testimonial at the National Day of Truth and Reconciliation ceremony in Sooke on Sept. 30. (Kevin Laird - Sooke News Mirror)
T’Sou-ke Nation elder Shirley Alphonse reads a special prayer for residential school survivors at the National Day of Truth and Reconcilation event in Sooke on Sept. 30. More than 200 people attended the ceremony. (Kevin Laird - Sooke News Mirror)T’Sou-ke Nation elder Shirley Alphonse reads a special prayer for residential school survivors at the National Day of Truth and Reconcilation event in Sooke on Sept. 30. More than 200 people attended the ceremony. (Kevin Laird - Sooke News Mirror)
T’Sou-ke First Nation Chief Gordan Planes and Sooke Mayor Maja Tait raise the T’Sou-ke First Nation Flag at a ceremony at Municipal Hall on Sept. 29 as part of the National Day of Truth and Reconciliation. (Contributed - District of Sooke)T’Sou-ke First Nation Chief Gordan Planes and Sooke Mayor Maja Tait raise the T’Sou-ke First Nation Flag at a ceremony at Municipal Hall on Sept. 29 as part of the National Day of Truth and Reconciliation. (Contributed - District of Sooke)

More than 200 people gathered in downtown Sooke on Thursday (Sept. 30) for a special National Day of Truth and Reconciliation ceremony.

The day was made a federal statutory holiday earlier this year, as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission recommended in its 94 calls to action. It will be held annually on Sept. 30.

It honours the children who died while being forced to attend residential schools and the survivors, families and communities still affected by the system’s legacy.

Sept. 30 is also Orange Shirt Day, which remembers the story of Phyllis Webstad, a former residential school student who had her orange shirt taken away on her first day at residential school.

Across the country, people are encouraged to wear orange to spread awareness, support an Indigenous-run business or organization if they can, and take time to learn and reflect.

RELATED: First Nation flag takes permanent residency outside Sooke Municipal Hall

RELATED: Victoria’s Orange Shirt Day is born out of trauma, friendship and hope



editor@sookenewsmirror.com

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