Training is just a part of life for Josiah, Caleb and Matthew Ney. The brothers are up and coming triathletes who now live in New Zealand, but who came back to Vancouver Island to compete. (Tim Collins / Sooke News Mirror)

Ney brothers return to Island compete in triathlon

Now living in New Zealand, the three are up and coming international athletes

Josiah, Caleb, and Mathew Ney are three young men who share a passion for the triathlon.

The Vancouver Island natives have returned to Sooke from their new home in New Zealand to compete in the Kelowna Apple Triathlon. That’s an International Triathlon Union Camtri event that will give them an opportunity to earn valuable ITU points they’ll require if they hope to qualify for events like the world championships.

The three brothers are all recognized as up and coming triathletes in New Zealand and have made a name for themselves in one of the most difficult endurance sport.

The family moved to New Zealand four years ago and hold dual citizenships.

“I’ve been competing since I was nine years old. I watched the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, and I just loved the idea of triathlon,” said Josiah, now 19.

“I grew up doing a lot of sports – lots of running and hiking – and I was already biking so I just needed to learn how to swim. I did and then participated in my first race in Victoria that year.”

Of course, the initial distances facing Josiah were a fraction of the sprint distances he most often races these days. Those races now involve a 750-metre swim, a 20-kilometre bike ride and a five-kilometre run.

He also races the standard Olympic distance; a race that’s exactly double the distance of the sprint race.

RELATED: Ironman races exceed Olympic standard

Given Josiah’s passion for the sport, it isn’t at all surprising that his brother Caleb, 16, also became involved in the sport at an early age.

“I got pulled into it by this one,” said Caleb with a grin, gesturing at his older brother.

“I started a year after Josiah so I was seven at the time. Right now I’m racing the same distances he is, so it’s a lot of fun.”

For his part, Matthew, the youngest of the brothers, had the earliest start.

“I started when I was four years old. I did the same race as these guys, although I remember that I did the whole run portion still wearing my bike helmet,” Matthew, 14, recalled. “I had a little trouble getting it off … it was taking too long, so I left it on.”

RELATED: Triathlon gaining in popularity

The family’s passion for the sport has extended to mom and dad, Kate and Patrick, although their involvement started only after they found themselves driving the boys to events and decided that they may as well try their hand at the sport.

“We take part, but we’re what’s known as ‘completers, not competers,’” joked Kate. “But it has given us an appreciation of how difficult the races are.”

The life of a triathlete has helped shape the lives of all three brothers.

They admitted that their passion for the triathlon tends to set them apart from many of their school mates.

“You find out pretty quickly who the people are that you want to hang out with. We’ve all got a lot of friends we’ve made competing, of course,” said Matthew.

“But at school, it’s sort of natural to hang around with the athletes … they sort of get it and can relate.”

That’s not to say that they haven’t considered life beyond triathlon. Josiah hopes to pursue a career in sports medicine, but is quick to say that his dream of competing in the Olympics is still front of mind.

As for his brothers, they haven’t settled on a career path, but the shared dream of Olympic competition will continue to send them out for training and competition for the foreseeable future.



mailto:tim.collins@sookenewsmirror.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

 

Headed out for a training ride Josiah and Caleb Ney are watched by younger brother Matthew, who is all set for his training swim. The trio are avid triathletes. (Tim Collins / Sooke News mirror)

Just Posted

WATCH: Our Place Therapeutic Recovery Community turns into a ‘place of healing’

500 volunteers, 120 businesses worked to transform View Royal community

A party for 11 pups and their adoptive families in Beckwith Park in Saanich

The coonhound siblings reunited at a barbeque on Saturday

HarbourCats bats hot in home return

Victoria squad downs Yakima Valley Pippins 17-2

Victoria veteran receives French Legion of Honour, becoming knight of France

Ted Vaughan was a pilot in the 408 “Goose” Squadron in WW2

Witness the passion and fire of flamenco in Victoria this July

Seventh annual Victoria Flamenco Festival features free and ticketed performances downtown

Rich the Vegan scoots across Canada for the animals

Rich Adams is riding his push scooter across Canada to bring awareness to the dog meat trade in Asia

Canadian high school science courses behind on climate change, says UBC study

Researchers found performance on key areas varies by province and territory

Six inducted into BC Hockey Hall of Fame

The 26th ceremony in Penticton welcomed powerful figures both from on and off the ice

RCMP investigate two shootings in the Lower Mainland

Incidents happened in Surrey, with a victim being treated at Langley Memorial Hospital

CRA program to help poor file taxes yields noticeable bump in people helped

Extra money allows volunteer-driven clinics to operate year-round

Recall: Certain Pacific oysters may pose threat of paralytic shellfish poisoning

Consumers urged to either return affected packages or throw them out

How a Kamloops-born man helped put us on the moon

Jim Chamberlin did troubleshooting for the Apollo program, which led to its success

Sexual harassment complaints soaring amid ‘frat boy culture’ in Canada’s airline industry

‘It’s a #MeToo dumpster fire…and it’s exhausting for survivors’

Most Read