Environment

Westerly file photo

Official crackdown coming for illegal campers around Tofino and Ucluelet

Increased enforcement on patrol this summer as officials urge visitors to respect the West Coast

Westerly file photo
A roadside dump of a couch in Saanich where the district spent nearly $30,000 on similar cleanup in the first four months of the year. (Christine van Reeuwyk/News Staff)

Roadside trash costs Greater Victoria taxpayers in cash, money, health

A ‘free’ couch not properly disposed of can result in microplastics in nature

A roadside dump of a couch in Saanich where the district spent nearly $30,000 on similar cleanup in the first four months of the year. (Christine van Reeuwyk/News Staff)
Jim Townley, president of the Saanichton Village Association, receives a $5,000 donation from Lisa Green and Melanie Bolster of Western Coast Insurance in Saanichton toward the Saanichton Bike N’ Ride located off Lisnoe Ave near the Fresh Cup Roastery Café with officials set to celebrate its official opening Saturday, June 4. (Wolf Depner/News Staff)

Cycling community to ring in new Bike N’ Ride in Central Saanich

Official ribbon cutting scheduled for Saturday, June 4 in Saanichton

Jim Townley, president of the Saanichton Village Association, receives a $5,000 donation from Lisa Green and Melanie Bolster of Western Coast Insurance in Saanichton toward the Saanichton Bike N’ Ride located off Lisnoe Ave near the Fresh Cup Roastery Café with officials set to celebrate its official opening Saturday, June 4. (Wolf Depner/News Staff)
Bioform’s Rami Younes (right) and Jordan MacKenzie (left) showing a sheet of the bioplastic. (Credit: Kai Jacobson/UBC Applied Science)

UBC scientists aim to put plastic in the past with 2 new inventions

Biodegradable product could replace plastic, unique coating could extend its life

Bioform’s Rami Younes (right) and Jordan MacKenzie (left) showing a sheet of the bioplastic. (Credit: Kai Jacobson/UBC Applied Science)
A sign opposing coal development in the eastern slopes of the Livingston range south west of Longview, Alta., Wednesday, June 16, 2021.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Alberta town endorses community-developed policy saying no to coal mining in Rockies

High River has joined 30 organizations in signing a document pushing prohibition of coal in Alberta

A sign opposing coal development in the eastern slopes of the Livingston range south west of Longview, Alta., Wednesday, June 16, 2021.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Grade 12 students Shona Sinclair (left), Katie Bentley, Sophia Taylor and Olivia Friesen, first saw the original model in Grade 9. Now they enjoy the benefits of the new model in their Oak Bay High classroom. (Christine van Reeuwyk/News Staff)
Grade 12 students Shona Sinclair (left), Katie Bentley, Sophia Taylor and Olivia Friesen, first saw the original model in Grade 9. Now they enjoy the benefits of the new model in their Oak Bay High classroom. (Christine van Reeuwyk/News Staff)
Volunteers and researchers with Mount Arrowsmith Biosphere Region Research Institute (MABRRI) conducted a two-day clam abundance survey in the Nanoose Bay Recreational Shellfish Reserve on May 14 and May 15, 2022. (Kevin Forsyth photo)

Researchers trying to track clam numbers notice Nanoose Bay drop-off

No confirmation if it represents natural fluctuation or another cause

Volunteers and researchers with Mount Arrowsmith Biosphere Region Research Institute (MABRRI) conducted a two-day clam abundance survey in the Nanoose Bay Recreational Shellfish Reserve on May 14 and May 15, 2022. (Kevin Forsyth photo)
Langford Mayor Stew Young bristled Monday at the suggestion the city needs an environmental protection advisory committee, saying such a body would duplicate work already being done by the parks and beautification committee. (Justin Samanski-Langille/News Staff)

Langford council rejects environment protection committee idea

Upset mayor says misinformation out there about city’s environmental record

Langford Mayor Stew Young bristled Monday at the suggestion the city needs an environmental protection advisory committee, saying such a body would duplicate work already being done by the parks and beautification committee. (Justin Samanski-Langille/News Staff)
The Juan de Fuca Trails Community Society has raised about $100,000 in pledges to buy a 58-acre parcel of land for a community park. (Contributed - Joyce Mckinnon)

Donations needed to land new park in Sooke Region

Juan de Fuca Community Trails Society covets 58-acre Otter Point property

The Juan de Fuca Trails Community Society has raised about $100,000 in pledges to buy a 58-acre parcel of land for a community park. (Contributed - Joyce Mckinnon)
The Sparks Lake wildfire shown on June 30, 2021. Beginning in 2022, the B.C. government will provide communities with at least $38,000 a year to fight climate change. (BC Wildfire Service photo)

B.C. communities to receive new annual climate action funding

Each to recieve at least $38,000 annually for next 3 years

The Sparks Lake wildfire shown on June 30, 2021. Beginning in 2022, the B.C. government will provide communities with at least $38,000 a year to fight climate change. (BC Wildfire Service photo)
The invasive shiny geranium, distinguishable by its red, smooth stem and glossy leaves, is a plant species being closely monitored in the Capital Region District, as well as the province. (Bruce Newhouse/King County Department of Environment)

Invasive plant rampant in Saanich, CRD a ‘hotspot’ for shiny geranium

Officials count on landowners, general public to report sightings of plant

The invasive shiny geranium, distinguishable by its red, smooth stem and glossy leaves, is a plant species being closely monitored in the Capital Region District, as well as the province. (Bruce Newhouse/King County Department of Environment)
Pending adoption, Sidney will ban plastic checkout bags, plastic straws, plastic utensils (including stir sticks), and foam service ware starting Jan. 1, 2023. (Black Press Media file photo)

Sidney sticking a fork in plastic utensils, checkout bags

Bylaw would come into effect Jan. 1, 2023

Pending adoption, Sidney will ban plastic checkout bags, plastic straws, plastic utensils (including stir sticks), and foam service ware starting Jan. 1, 2023. (Black Press Media file photo)
Amanda Evans, left, instructs Green Team Greater Victoria volunteers on where to cut invasive species at a previous event. The group is seeking volunteers for a busy slate of events this month. (Black Press Media file photo)

Greater Victoria Green Team seeking volunteers for May events

The group has a busy slate of events this month, cleaning up invasive species across the CRD

Amanda Evans, left, instructs Green Team Greater Victoria volunteers on where to cut invasive species at a previous event. The group is seeking volunteers for a busy slate of events this month. (Black Press Media file photo)
The Seamor Chinook ROV claw approaching a submerged pot, as seen from the navigation controller on the vessel. (Photo submitted)

Vancouver Island submersible craft grapples ‘ghost’ fishing gear from B.C.’s ocean floor

Seamor Marine involved in project to remove abandoned traps on northern coast

The Seamor Chinook ROV claw approaching a submerged pot, as seen from the navigation controller on the vessel. (Photo submitted)
Marine biologist Colin Foord, rear, and musician J.D. McKay work at their Coral Morphologic lab, Wednesday, March 2, 2022, in Miami. They have been on a 15-year mission to raise awareness about dying coral reefs with a company that presents the issue through science and art. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)

Coral reefs provide stunning images of a world under assault

Coral Morphologic shows real-world example of how coral communities can adapt at busy port of Miami

Marine biologist Colin Foord, rear, and musician J.D. McKay work at their Coral Morphologic lab, Wednesday, March 2, 2022, in Miami. They have been on a 15-year mission to raise awareness about dying coral reefs with a company that presents the issue through science and art. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
This 2021 image provided by LeighAnn Ferrara shows Ferrara’s young son as he watches a rabbit on a grassy patch of his White Plains, N.Y., yard, which is surrounded by planting beds of flowers, vegetables and trees. Many people are converting parts of their grass lawns into more diverse plantings. (LeighAnn Ferrara via AP

North America’s love affair with the lawn is getting messy

Some homeowners seeing a well-manicured lawn as an anachronism, even a threat

This 2021 image provided by LeighAnn Ferrara shows Ferrara’s young son as he watches a rabbit on a grassy patch of his White Plains, N.Y., yard, which is surrounded by planting beds of flowers, vegetables and trees. Many people are converting parts of their grass lawns into more diverse plantings. (LeighAnn Ferrara via AP
Bob Peart of the Friends of Shoal Harbour Society joins Robert Bateman and Margaret Atwood as winners of the Douglas H. Pimlott Award from Nature Canada. He received the award in a ceremony last week. (Courtesy of Nature Canada)

Sidney’s Bob Peart wins top national conservation award

Nature Canada represents 30,000 members and more than 1,000 nature organizations

Bob Peart of the Friends of Shoal Harbour Society joins Robert Bateman and Margaret Atwood as winners of the Douglas H. Pimlott Award from Nature Canada. He received the award in a ceremony last week. (Courtesy of Nature Canada)
While some people may participate in No Mow May, the Nature Conservancy of Canada urges everyone to take the next step in naturalizing backyards or balconies. (Christine van Reeuwyk/News Staff)
While some people may participate in No Mow May, the Nature Conservancy of Canada urges everyone to take the next step in naturalizing backyards or balconies. (Christine van Reeuwyk/News Staff)
A beautiful sunset on the water during April. (Photo by Kathi Diewert)

More than a double shot of rain fell on southeast Vancouver Island this April

Cooler temperatures also brought a dusting of snow and hail as spring comes in cool

A beautiful sunset on the water during April. (Photo by Kathi Diewert)
Don Davidson pictured at Pigeon Lake Alta, on Sunday May 1, 2022. 2022. Thousands of Alberta cottagers and homeowners are waiting nervously to see if a provincial regulator will allow a large feedlot to be developed near the popular and environmentally fragile recreational lake. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Proposed cattle feedlot threatens popular but fragile Alberta lake, residents say

G&S Cattle of Ponoka, Alta., wants to pen 4,000 cattle about four kilometres west of Pigeon Lake

Don Davidson pictured at Pigeon Lake Alta, on Sunday May 1, 2022. 2022. Thousands of Alberta cottagers and homeowners are waiting nervously to see if a provincial regulator will allow a large feedlot to be developed near the popular and environmentally fragile recreational lake. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson