Gina Kaslauskas does her shopping using a new smart cart, part of a pilot project, at a Sobeys grocery store in Oakville, Ont., on Tuesday, November 12, 2019. Shoppers pushing one of 10 new smart carts at a Toronto Sobeys Inc. store can skip the cashier or self-checkout as their carts scan any items put into them, track their total bill and accept payment. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Gina Kaslauskas does her shopping using a new smart cart, part of a pilot project, at a Sobeys grocery store in Oakville, Ont., on Tuesday, November 12, 2019. Shoppers pushing one of 10 new smart carts at a Toronto Sobeys Inc. store can skip the cashier or self-checkout as their carts scan any items put into them, track their total bill and accept payment. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Beyond self-checkouts: Carts, apps look to make grocery shopping hassle-free

Canadians increasingly expect a more tech-savvy shopping experience, experts say

Shoppers pushing one of 10 new smart carts at a Toronto Sobeys store can scan their items on the spot, track their total bill and accept payment, which means they can skip the cashier or self-checkout altogether.

The artificial intelligence-equipped carts are the latest aspect in grocers’ efforts to streamline the shopping experience as consumers became increasingly accustomed to convenience.

Despite all the advancements found in a modern grocery store, customers are still required to gather their groceries, unload them at checkout, and then place their purchases into bags.

“This helps remove a little bit of that friction,” said Jacquelin Weatherbee, communications director for Sobeys.

The grocer announced late last month it purchased 10 smart carts that it is starting to pilot at an Oakville, Ont., location.

For now, shoppers using the carts must allow it to scan each item they place inside. Eventually, the cart, which “gets smarter over time,” will learn what each product is and the company will remove the scanning requirement, said Weatherbee.

The cart also weighs produce, keeps a running tally of the total bill, and accepts payment. One feature it lacks is a seat to hold a child.

“It really limits the amount of time you’re going from product to stand to belt to bag for the customer,” said Weatherbee.

Sobeys hopes to develop the technology to include suggestions about missing ingredients for recipes based on what is already in the cart and the ability for customers to upload their shopping lists.

ALSO READ: No-waste grocery stores not a garbage idea to help tackle food waste

The carts — created by New York-based Caper Inc., which did not respond to an interview request — show one way grocers turn to tech to eliminate the need for traditional checkouts.

Amazon debuted its Amazon Go system in Seattle in 2018. Shoppers must have an Amazon account and the Amazon Go app, which grants them access to the store. Customers take the products they want and leave. In-store technology tracks the purchase and charges their app.

Amazon now operates 18 of the Go stores in four cities in America — with six more shops on the way, according to its website. With the tech titan’s acquisition of Whole Foods, including its Canadian locations, it’s possible that the concept will one day land in Canada.

Weatherbee said Sobeys likes its smart cart solution because of the ability to add functionality over time.

Loblaw Companies Ltd. quietly rolled out a pilot in a similar vein last year.

Now in eight stores, customers can use the company’s app on their cellphones to scan items as they shop. The app aggregates all the products into one bar code, which can be scanned by a cashier or at the self-checkout when customers pay.

“There’s still quite a few improvements to be made on that product,” said Lauren Steinberg, a vice president at Loblaw digital. That includes adding the ability to pay within the app rather than at the checkout, which the company plans to roll out next year.

Walmart Canada shifted to a similar system that relies on a consumer’s phone this year after testing a handheld device, much like a wand, that allowed customers to scan products while they shopped.

The former scan-and-go system reportedly created frustration for some shoppers.

“Most customers like to actually use their own device, touch their own device, feel their own device,” said Alykhan Kanji, vice-president of format development at Walmart Canada.

When the company launched scan and go, he added, they hypothesized the process would shift to consumer phones eventually.

Shoppers at six Walmart Canada locations in the Greater Toronto Area can now test the program, dubbed Fastlane, via the Walmart app.

Already the company has made changes based on consumer response.

Customers balked at suddenly having to weigh produce to give the app the per kilogram cost of, for example, a bunch of bananas. Walmart introduced per unit pricing for as much produce as possible in response so shoppers can now scan the food without having to weigh it.

Canadians, especially younger demographics that are rapidly becoming one of the most important consumer groups, increasingly expect a more tech-savvy shopping experience, said Joel Gregoire, associate director for Mintel’s Canada food and drinks reports.

“They’ve grown up at a time when they are very much tied to their technology — to the point where this is all they’ve ever really known,” he said.

“And for grocers to have a competitive advantage or to be relevant, they have to make sure they offer an experience that is linked to their technology.”

But Gregoire said there’s benefits beyond traffic.

Technology could lower labour costs in the long run, as it replaces the need for cashiers. The grocers tended to believe they would redistribute staff formerly tied to the cash register onto the store floor — even further enhancing customer experience.

The data gathered from these apps could help companies learn more about their customers as well, said Gregoire.

If the smart carts and apps can track how customers move through the store, that information can help grocers improve their layouts, he said.

“I’m only kind of scratching the surface in terms of how that can be used, but certainly data is king in retail.”

Aleksandra Sagan, The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Shea Smith is one of three creators of The Homeless Idea podcast. (Kendra Crighton/News Staff)
Victoria podcasters talks homelessness first-hand

Three homeless Victoria residents created The Homeless Idea to give themselves a voice

The president and chief executive officer of BC Ferries promises additional reviews to help sustain BC Ferries. (Black Press Media File)
BC Ferries to review expenditures following 43 per cent passenger drop in 2020

Promise from CEO follows new figures showing significant decline in passengers

B.C. SPCA’s Wild Animal Rehabilitation Centre voted favourite non-profit in the 2020 Best of the WestShore Awards. (Facebook/Wild ARC)
Wild ARC in Metchosin voted favourite non-profit for second year in a row

The rehabilitation centre treated nearly 3,000 animals last year

Local MLA Adam Olsen, a member of the Tsartlip Nation, here seen before the 2020 provincial election, said a new report finding “widespread systemic racism against Indigenous people” in the provincial health care system does not surprise Indigenous people. (Hansard TV)
MLA, Tsartlip member says ‘silo’ approach won’t work dealing with racism in health care

Adam Olsen calls for comprehensive approach in dealing with systemic racism

Aragon Properties’ proposed development for the corner of Cook and Pendergast streets in Cook Street Village was voted down by Victoria city council on Thursday night after a public hearing. (File contributed/ City of Victoria)
Lack of affordable housing spells end for Cook Street Village project in Victoria

Council narrowly defeats proposal for four-storey building on former Pic-A-Flic Video site

A B.C. Ambulance Service paramedic wearing a face mask to curb the spread of COVID-19 moves a stretcher outside an ambulance at Royal Columbia Hospital, in New Westminster, B.C., on Sunday, November 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. records deadliest weekend of COVID-19 pandemic with 46 deaths; more than 2,300 cases

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry provides COVID-19 update

Fossil finds at Mt. Stephen. (Photo: Sarah Fuller/Parks Canada)
Extreme hiking, time travel and science converge in the Burgess Shale

Climb high in the alpine and trace your family tree back millions of years – to our ocean ancestors

Kettle bells sit aligned in an indoor fitness studio. (PIxabay.com)
1 COVID-19 case at a B.C. fitness studio leads to 104 more infections, 6 school exposures

According to case data released by Fraser Health, one case of the novel coronavirus carries a big impact

Vehicles drive past a display thanking essential workers in Burnaby, B.C. on Sunday, Nov. 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Marissa Tiel
B.C. changing COVID-19 case reporting as virus spread continues

Manual counting takes more time, leads to errors

Black Press Media and BraveFace have come together to support children facing life-threatening conditions. Net proceeds from these washable, reusable, three-layer masks go to Make-A-Wish Foundation BC & Yukon.
Put on a BraveFace: Mask fundraiser helps make children’s wishes come true

From Black Press Media + BraveFace – adult, youth and kid masks support Make-A-Wish Foundation

Christy Jordan-Fenton is the co-author of the book Fatty Legs, which has been mentioned amid the controversy of an Abbotsford school assignment on residential schools.
Co-author of residential schools book condemns controversial Abbotsford class assignment

Children’s book mentioned amid controversy at W. A. Fraser Middle School

Kootenay East MLA Tom Shypitka takes over as energy and mines critic for the B.C. Liberal opposition. Kelowna-Lake Country MLA Norm Letnick (right) moves from health critic to assistant deputy speaker. (Hansard TV)
B.C. Liberals pick critics to take on Horgan’s NDP majority

Interim leader Shirley Bond takes seniors, long-term care

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance Chrystia Freeland listens to a question from a reporter on the phone during a news conference in Ottawa, Monday, Nov. 30, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Spending too little worse than spending too much, Freeland says as Canada’s deficit tops $381B

‘The risk of providing too little support now outweighs that of providing too much’

Left to right: A screenshot of NTC nurse navigator Lesley Cerney, FNHA regional mental health manager Georjeana Paterson and Island Health’s medical health officer Dr. Charmaine Enns addressing Ehattesaht community members from Ehatis reserve in a Facebook live update. (Ehattesaht First Nation/Facebook)
Medical team sent to Ehatis reserve near Zeballos to guide community through COVID outbreak

17 cases, eight recoveries and no hospitalizations as Island Health praises First Nation’s response

Most Read