How to keep local news visible in your Facebook feed

Facebook has changed the news feed to emphasize personal connections. You might see less news.

We’re always happy when users respond to our stories and photos they see on Facebook. It’s a good way for us to connect with you — so let’s protect it.

Facebook has changed your news feed, giving preference to posts from friends and family. This means you could see fewer stories from news sources like us.

If you are like most people who regularly get some of their news from social media, you probably want to keep seeing reliable information from us and other trustworthy journalism sites on Facebook. There is a simple way to make this happen.

From your desktop computer:

1. Open a desktop web browser and go to the our Facebook page. (Click the Facebook icon at the top of this page.)

2. At the top, next to the “Like” button, find the word “Follow” or “Following.” (If it says “Follow,” click that once. It will change to “Following”.)

3. Click the word “Following” and choose “See First.”

From the Facebook mobile app:

1. Open the app and tap the menu icon with the three horizontal lines. (On some devices, it’s at upper right. On others, it’s at lower right.)

2. Scroll to Settings and tap “News Feed Preferences.”

3. On the screen that pops up, tap “Prioritize who to see first.”

4. The pages you like and people you’re friends with will appear. Find us in the list and tap the logo. When you’re finished, tap “Done” in the upper right corner.

Thank you! You’ve helped ensure your Facebook connection to the best social media source for local news in B.C.

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