In a Facebook post, photographer Tammy-Lynn Post explains the streaks are stars and the lines that look like scratches are comets. (Tammy-Lynn Post photo)

In a Facebook post, photographer Tammy-Lynn Post explains the streaks are stars and the lines that look like scratches are comets. (Tammy-Lynn Post photo)

Photographer captures Perseid meteor shower over Shuswap

Six hours spent capturing hundreds of meteors streaking across night sky

A local photographer stayed up for more than six hours to capture hundreds of meteors streaking across the night sky in Salmon Arm.

On the night of Monday, Aug. 12, Tammy-Lynn Post took a trip down Salmon River Road to watch and take photos of the annual Perseid meteor shower.

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At the shower’s peak, a stargazer can see roughly 100 meteors an hour in dark sky locations.

Post started taking photos at about 9:30 p.m. and took the last photo around 3:30 a.m. on Tuesday morning. She then shared her photos to a Shuswap Facebook page explaining the streaks of light in the photos.

“The ones that look out of place kinda like scratches, those ones are the meteors. The rest are all stars,” wrote Post describing her photos.

Named after the constellation Perseus, the Perseid shower is made of tiny space debris coming off the Swift-Tuttle comet.


@CameronJHT
Cameron.thomson@saobserver.net

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At the Perseid meteor shower’s peak, a star gazer will see roughly 100 meteors an hour in dark sky locations. (Tammy-Lynn Post photo)

At the Perseid meteor shower’s peak, a star gazer will see roughly 100 meteors an hour in dark sky locations. (Tammy-Lynn Post photo)

Photographer captures Perseid meteor shower over Shuswap