B.C. Centre for Disease Control has released a number of suggestions to be sexually active and safe during COVID-19. (Pixabay)

B.C. Centre for Disease Control has released a number of suggestions to be sexually active and safe during COVID-19. (Pixabay)

Summer lovin’ during a pandemic – there’s now a B.C.-made guide for that

Similar to going grocery shopping or seeing friends, if you are feeling sick, skip sex

The B.C. Centre for Disease Control has led the charge on providing need-to-know tips to limit the spread of COVID-19, answering all kinds of questions – including a guide dedicated to navigating safe sex during a pandemic.

“Sex can be very important for mental, social and physical well-being; it is a part of everyday life,” the webpage on the centre’s website reads. “People can, will and should continue to have sex during the COVID-19 pandemic.”

But there are a number of strategies to help reduce the spread of the novel coronavirus.

COVID-19 spreads through liquid droplets found in saliva and when a person coughs, sneezes or even talks. Researchers say the virus can be spread by touching contaminated surfaces and then touching the face, eyes, nose or mouth, as well.

While the virus has been found in semen and feces, it is not yet clear if the virus can be transmitted through sex, the centre said.

ALSO READ: Is COVID-19 baby boom a myth? How relationships might be tested during the pandemic

That’s why the centre is recommending people have one, a few or regular sex partners and discuss how to make activities safer for one another, such as wearing a mask and being transparent about any symptoms that could be linked to COVID-19.

Other suggestions include frequently showering before and after, avoid or limit kissing, and limit face-to-face contact.

“You are your safest sex partner,” the online guide reads.

This isn’t the first time sexual relationships in wake of the pandemic has made headlines – and likely won’t be the last. In May, the centre released guidelines for sex workers reduce COVID-19’s spread.

In June, provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry fielded a question about “summer loving” as British Columbians were given the green light to open up their pandemic bubble to a few close friends.

“If you’re somebody who’s single and doesn’t have a lot of other people who may be at risk that you’re having contact with, then you can think about this in a different way, perhaps,” Henry said at the time.

“We can’t stop it being summer, and love still happens in the time of COVID.”

Like all other activities: if you’re feeling sick, stay home and self-isolate.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

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