Photos/video: Wildlife play games with boy on the rocks in Oak Bay

Oak Bay men capture young boy’s shoreline adventure with wildlife

Oak Bay’s Aryeh Jackson sits atop the rocks near Turkey Head while a seal plays the game it usually reserves for a resident blue heron. (Dr. Andrew Ross photo)                                 A seal plays with a resident blue heron. (Dr. Andrew Ross photo)                                 Oak Bay’s Aryeh Jackson sits atop the rocks near Turkey Head while a seal plays the game it usually reserves for a resident blue heron. (Dr. Andrew Ross photo)

Oak Bay’s Aryeh Jackson sits atop the rocks near Turkey Head while a seal plays the game it usually reserves for a resident blue heron. (Dr. Andrew Ross photo) A seal plays with a resident blue heron. (Dr. Andrew Ross photo) Oak Bay’s Aryeh Jackson sits atop the rocks near Turkey Head while a seal plays the game it usually reserves for a resident blue heron. (Dr. Andrew Ross photo)

Oak Bay wildlife photographer Dr. Andrew Ross and Oak Bay columnist Bill Smith were walking by “Gracepoint” (the car lay-by next to Turkey Head) when they spotted a “Kodak” moment on Sunday.

“There was a young teenager sat on the rocks at exactly at the point where very occasionally our Blue Heron plays with one of our harbour seals,” Smith says. “The touching behaviour occurs when the seal pushes small fish underwater towards the heron, allowing him to fish from the rocks without getting wet.

Usually a few seagulls sit or swim close by waiting to pick up any droppings.

On this day, the Oak Bay boy, Aryeh Jackson, sat in the exact spot the blue heron likes to sit.

The seal appeared and began his same game, swishing the smelt towards the boy on the rock.

Of course Aryeh had no idea he was being asked to play, and take a fish.

Talking to the Grandparents, a few minutes later we explained to them, and to Areyeh, what was happening and how rare it was to see this little game.”

That’s a game Dr. Ross captured on film in 2006.

“This was undoubtedly a magical moment for everyone involved but especially for young Aryeh Jackson,” Smith says. “I suspect and hope he will become an advocate for our Great Salish Sea.”


 

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Oak Bay’s Aryeh Jackson sits atop the rocks near Turkey Head while a seal plays the game it usually reserves for a resident blue heron. (Dr. Andrew Ross photo)                                 A seal plays with a resident blue heron. (Dr. Andrew Ross photo)                                 Oak Bay’s Aryeh Jackson sits atop the rocks near Turkey Head while a seal plays the game it usually reserves for a resident blue heron. (Dr. Andrew Ross photo)

Oak Bay’s Aryeh Jackson sits atop the rocks near Turkey Head while a seal plays the game it usually reserves for a resident blue heron. (Dr. Andrew Ross photo) A seal plays with a resident blue heron. (Dr. Andrew Ross photo) Oak Bay’s Aryeh Jackson sits atop the rocks near Turkey Head while a seal plays the game it usually reserves for a resident blue heron. (Dr. Andrew Ross photo)