A memorial garden is being established for longtime Metchosin councillor Moralea Milne, who died in a car crash last July. (File photo)

Volunteers begin work on memorial garden for former Metchosin counsellor

Garden a fitting tribute to Moralea Milne, a champion of Garry oak ecosystems

After Metchosin Coun. Moralea Milne was tragically killed in a car accident last summer, community members came together to recommend a memorial garden in her honour.

People thought the garden would be a fitting tribute for Milne, who was a “great champion” for Garry oak ecosystems and the use of native plants around the community, Coun. Andy MacKinnon said.

ALSO READ: Counting all creatures, great and small

The Garry oak meadow west of the municipal hall will incorporate the garden. It’s bordered on one side by the driveway to the municipal hall and on the long side by a road that leads to the equestrian area, cricket pitch and field.

Volunteers have begun removing invasive plants and establishing new ones, including stone plants.

“People…have been keen to help,” MacKinnon said.

The primary tasks are repairing and replacing the fence around the meadow.

ALSO READ: Foundation aims to preserve Metchosin’s natural assets

“If new native plants are established there, they will be eaten fairly quickly by the municipal bunnies,” he said.

Volunteers, led by Katy Nelson, will have to find a way to make the enclosure rabbit proof.

It’s a “multi-year process” that’s a fitting tribute to Milne and her love of the Garry oak ecosystem and native plants, MacKinnon said.

“We’ve had a huge number of volunteers from the community,” he added.

Katy Nelson, a volunteer who is spearheading the project, submitted a proposal in November requesting funding and partial municipal labour to help build the fence and a pathway.

The Metchosin foundation provided the project a $5,000 grant a $500 each year for ten years for “upkeep and continued maintenance,” Nelson said. Council also unanimously passed a proposal in principle that its public works would help with the fence and in adding a rabbit barrier.

“We’re not just looking at building a pretty little meadow. It is to be restored, and it’s ongoing because, something like that, you don’t just do it and walk away from it. It always needs care and attention,” she added.

swikar.oli@goldstreamgazette.com


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

New Coast Guard ship crashes into Ogden Point breakwater

‘It is fairly unprecedented that it would happen’

Sidney group offers free, fun ‘trishaw’ bike rides to seniors

Physical disability and mental obstruction no barrier to trips around town

Student Voice: Vic astronomer tracking the New Horizons path

Local astronomer part of team studying New Horizons spacecraft

Second non-stop flight added between Prince George and Victoria

Starting June 23 flyers will have the choice of flying in the morning or afternoon

The shores will not rock in 2019

Atomique Productions announce Rock the Shores festival will not return in 2019, future is uncertain

Victoria hosts ‘Ultimate Hockey Fan Cave’

The hockey cave was recently featured on a Netflix special

Judges on Twitter? Ethical guidance for those on the bench under review

Canadian judges involvement in community life are among issues under review

Trudeau calls May 6 byelection for B.C. riding of Nanaimo-Ladysmith

The riding opened up when Sheila Malcolmson resigned in January

Calgary captain has 3 points as Flames torch Canucks 3-1

Giordano leads way as Alberta side cracks 100-point plateau

Fire crews battle large blaze at Courtenay hostel

Courtenay Fire Chief Don Bardonnex said nobody was injured

1,300 cruise ship passengers rescued by helicopter amid storm off Norway’s coast

Rescue teams with helicopters and boats were sent to evacuate the cruise ship under extremely difficult circumstances

B.C. university to offer first graduate program on mindfulness in Canada

University of the Fraser Valley says the mostly-online program focuses on self-care and well being

Province announces $18.6 million for B.C. Search and Rescue

The funding, spread over three years, to pay for operations, equipment, and training

Late-season wave of the flu makes its round in B.C.

BC Centre for Disease Control reported 50 per cent jump in flu cases in first weeks of March

Most Read