Dine Around/Stay in Town continues at restaurants and hotels around the region, including the Steamship Grill and Bar (pictured) on the Inner Harbour. Photo courtesy Steamship Grill and Bar

Still time to try out new dinner spots during Victoria’s Dine Around/Stay in Town

Annual promotion helps introduce people to local restaurants and hotels

Looking for someplace different to try for that special date or meal out with the family?

Tourism Victoria and the BC Restaurant and Foodservices Association’s Victoria branch are heading into their second weekend for the annual Dine Around Stay in Town. On now through Feb. 4, the off-season promotion is designed to give area residents and visitors alike a chance to test out local eateries for the first time or visit favourite spots for a choice of three-course meals specially crafted for the occasion.

Meals prices are evened off at $20, $30, $40 and $50 with each restaurant offering one or more of the price points.

Local hotels are also in on the act, offering special deals starting at $89 a night, aimed at the staycation market.

For more information and a list of participating businesses, visit tourismvictoria.com/eat-drink/dine-around.

editor@vicnews.com

Just Posted

Shamrocks push Timbermen to the edge in playoff series

Victoria beats Nanaimo 12-7 in Game 4 of WLA semifinals

B.C. man’s Tweet about painting over racist graffiti goes viral

Once a member of hate groups himself, Nick Cooper’s simple message had 350,000 likes in four days

Sexual assault victims often decide against giving rape kits to police: study

Across Canada, only 33 in every 1,000 cases of sexual assault are reported to the police

Great-grandmother hits the racetrack for 90th birthday celebration

To celebrate turning 89, she said she went skydiving

Cost to twin Trans Mountain pipeline now $1.9B higher, Kinder Morgan says

Financial documents now say the company expects a $9.3-billion price tag

EDITORIAL: Increased communication is a double-edged sword

Increased opportunities to comment on stories doesn’t change to tenets of journalism

Canadian laws could prevent emaciated killer whale from being treated

J50, also known as Scarlet, is one of 75 southern resident killer whales in B.C.’s coastal waters

Most Read