ICBC is preparing to increase rates for drivers with at-fault accidents. (Black Press files)

ICBC bad driver crackdown popular with public, survey finds

Driver penalty increases expected to take effect this fall

More than 80 per cent of B.C. residents support harsher insurance rate penalties for high-risk drivers, according to results of public feedback released Thursday by the B.C. government.

Attorney General David Eby sought input into proposed changes that would see steeper ICBC rate charges for excessive speeding, impaired driving and distracted driving, as well as bigger rate increases under the penalty point system for minor driving violations.

More than 34,000 people completed an online survey on the proposed changes, with 83.4 per cent supporting the idea of at-fault drivers in crashes paying more. Increasing rates for a single serious conviction within a three-year period, rather than allowing one at-fault claim before raising rates, was supported by 74.3 per cent of respondents.

The rate increases are being submitted to the B.C. Utilities Commission, and if approved they would take effect in the fall of 2018.

The survey showed 63 per cent support for eliminating or changing ICBC’s practice of allowing customers to pay for at-fault claims out of their own pockets, to avoid an insurance claim that would push up their rate. The most popular option, with 41 per cent support, was allowing out-of-pocket payment only for vehicle damage costing $2,000 or less.

The survey also found 75 per cent support for a fee to be charged when the registered owner does not list a secondary driver who is later found at fault in a crash.

The highest support, 91.5 per cent, was for a proposed change that would see the at-fault driver, not the registered owner, penalized with higher rates after a claim.

Just Posted

Four-sailing wait at BC Ferries Swartz Bay terminal

Full vessels create long waits on Friday afternoon

Tent city campers prepare to leave Uplands Park

Vehicle access remains restricted at Cattle Point

A year in tent city: Timeline of Camp Namegans

Since September 2017, Victoria’s homeless camp has set up in more than 20 locations

Tommy Chong says cannabis legalization makes him proud to be a Canadian

Legendary marijuana advocate and comedian celebrates cultural milestone at Kelowna event

‘Repeat test fails’ clogging up the system, says ICBC

Increased driver education key to shorter wait times, safer roads

Singer k.d. lang receives Alberta’s highest honour

Celebrated singer-songwriter k.d. lang received the Alberta Order of Excellence in Edmonton

Find your future at Black Press career fair in Victoria

More than 70 booths expected at Bay Street Armoury on Oct. 25

Crime Stoppers most wanted for Greater Victoria for Oct. 19

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

POLL: Do you support amalgamation for communities in the Capital Region?

Residents in Victoria and Saanich will be voting on Oct. 20 on… Continue reading

‘Mom, I’m in trouble:’ Canadian faces 10 years for alleged graffiti

Brittney Schneider, another tourist caught spraying message on walls of Tha Pae Gate in Thailand

Feds consulting on national anti-racism strategy behind closed doors

Heritage Minister Pablo Rodriguez says people still face systemic racism in some communities

Enbridge aims for mid-November to finish B.C. pipeline repair after blast

A natural gas pipeline that ruptured and burned near Prince George caused an explosion and fireball

How to get government cheques if Canada Post staff go on strike

The Canadian Union of Postal Workers said members could go on rotating strikes as early as Monday

Anti-SOGI school trustee files defamation lawsuit against BCTF president

Barry Neufeld says Glen Hansman’s words caused him “indignity,” “personal harassment,” and “anxiety”

Most Read