Lawyers launch distracted driving bus ad campaign

Working as an injury lawyer in Victoria, about 30 per cent of the cases Rory Lambert handles are a result of distracted driving.

Working as an injury lawyer in Victoria, about 30 per cent of the cases Rory Lambert handles are a result of distracted driving.

Impaired driving used to be the top issue in his generation, but now Lambert said that’s moved down the list behind speeding and distracted driving thanks to countless awareness campaigns throughout the years.

But Lambert views distracted driving as a more serious issue since phones are now such a big part of people’s lives. The most recent statistics from ICBC also show distracted driving contributed to 29 per cent of collisions in 2013, followed by speeding at 27 per cent and impaired driving at 24 per cent.

“Talking on the phone is so benign. We do it all the time,” said Lambert, noting distracted driving doesn’t just pertain to cell phones.

“The statistics are clear. Distractions like applying makeup, reading, or dialing a handheld device can make you up to 23 times more likely of being in a crash or near crash event. It has to stop.”

In order to draw awareness to and stop distracted driving, Lambert’s firm, Lambert & Williams, has launched a series of ads that will appear on five city buses.

Some of the slogans include: Pull your head out of your apps; Share the road, not your selfie; and YOLO, So dnt txt n drv, and were created by the firm’s staff members in an office competition.

The firm plans to run the ads as long as possible and change up the messaging once in a while. They’re also in talks to visit schools in the new year since the campaign mainly targets young people.

“If this campaign makes even one person rethink their decision and drive safer, our job will be done,” said Darren Williams, co-founder and partner of the firm. “This trend needs to change and we are hoping our message will encourage people to pay closer attention.”

In Victoria, police have placed plain clothed officers on city streets to simply watch what drivers are doing behind the wheel, particularly when they are stopped at a red light. Officers noticed those aged 16 to late 20s seem to be the worst when it comes to texting behind the wheel, despite a fine of $167 and three penalty points if caught doing so.

“People aren’t getting the message. I think that’s the disappointing part,” said acting Sgt. Ross Smith of the Victoria police traffic unit

“How much more can we do? We are constantly running campaigns.”

 

 

Just Posted

Increased rental construction boosts housing starts across Greater Victoria

Rest of Vancouver Island experiencing spillover effect from Greater Victoria

Bay Street Bridge construction begins today

Point Ellice Bridge will be closed to eastbound vehicle traffic until October

Some showers, high of 18 C for Tuesday

Plus a look ahead at your weekly forecast

Survey finds 15 per cent of Canadian cannabis users with a valid licence drive within two hours of using

Survey also finds middle-aged men are upping their usage following legalization

Feds launch tourism strategy designed to boost sector 25 per cent by 2025

The fund is supposed to back experiences that show off Canada’s strengths

Mamma Mia! poised to be biggest Chemainus Theatre show ever

Plenty of buzz as Island dinner theatre schedules ABBA-fueled romp

New book from Island author details social history of the E&N railway

Along the E&N tells the story of 32 establishments from Esquimalt to Campbell River.

Should B.C. already be implementing province-wide fire bans?

A petition is calling for B.C. Wildfire Service to issue a ban to reduce risk of human caused wildfires

Growing wildfire prompts evacuation of High Level, Alta.

Chuckegg Creek fire has been burning for several days, but grew substantially Sunday

Top women’s hockey player Natalie Spooner coming to B.C.

Natalie Spooner special guest at annual Grindstone charity weekend in Kelowna

Take-home drug testing kits latest pilot to help curb B.C.’s overdose crisis

Researchers look to see if fentanyl testing could be a useful tool for those who use drugs alone

Facebook takes down anti-vaxxer page that used image of late Canadian girl

Facebook said that the social media company has disabled the anti-vaccination page

Most Read