One man’s fentanyl horror story

Sooke resident Ken Davies shares how deadly drug nearly killed him

The first and only time Ken Davies overdosed on fentanyl he snorted two lines of cocaine. Six months after the incident, he is still suffering.

Davies unknowingly bought cocaine laced with fentanyl on New Year’s Eve.

“The last thing I remember I was standing at my kitchen table in the morning, and then everything went black,” recalled Davies.

“I woke up on the floor and it was dark out, my cellphone was dead, and I couldn’t move anything from the waist down.”

Davies was on the floor for 40 hours – 30 unconscious and 10 yelling for help. His ex-wife eventually came to his home, found him, and called 911.

“Nothing I’ve ever experienced can amount to the fear I felt then. I was laying on the floor thinking I was going to die and there’s nothing I could do about it.”

Once in the ambulance, Davies began to vomit violently.

For the first month after the overdose, Davies was bedridden in the hospital and couldn’t do anything.

“It was almost like losing him,” said Brenda Joynson, Ken’s mother. “We didn’t know if he was going to live or die. It’s amazing that he survived.”

Davies’ lungs filled with more than four litres of blood and mucus, which had to be surgically removed. He also had to undergo several dialysis treatments.

After two months, Davies was released from the hospital, but still suffers from the incident.

“I still have no feeling from my knee down in one of my legs. I see a specialist in eight months and if he can’t fix it the only other option is to remove that part of my leg.”

Because he can’t work due to his injuries, Davies lost his house and is living with his mother.

“This screwed my whole life up. I went from making $6,000 to $8, 000 a month, to losing everything.”

“But I’m lucky to survive. I’ve put my family through hell and I’m happy I get a second chance at life.”

Joynson said she believes it’s important for young people to be aware of the long-lasting traumatic affects that using drugs can have on your body.

“Why even try it?” said Joynson.

“It’s not just a quick fix or a high anymore, it can kill you. And if even if it doesn’t, look what you can be left with – the toll that it has taken on Kenny is unbelievable.”

“You cannot trust any drugs now-a-days,” said Davies.

He explained that it is almost impossible to know if something’s laced with fentanyl because there is no taste or smell.

“You don’t know it’s in you until it hits you,” said Davies.

dawn.gibson@sookenewsmirror.com

Just Posted

Coroners office investigates death of Victoria-area teen

Investigation involves ‘male teenager’, confirmed student at Oak Bay high

Greater Victoria Teachers’ Association joins counter-protest

GVTA released statement of support for LGBTQ in response to upcoming protest

WATCH: Topaz Park open house scheduled for Saturday

This will be the final stage of public engagement for park design

UPDATED: Health Canada looking into B.C. boy’s treatment of rabid dog saliva

BC Naturopathic Association questions Dr. Anke Zimmermann’s conduct on recent treatments

BCSPCA’s proposed limits on chickens go too far: urban food advocate

Capping the number of hens at 12 an unnecessary solution, Aaren Topley tells Victoria council

Lt.-Gov. Guichon believes she made the right decision

Outgoing Lt.-Gov Judith Guichon said her most memorable moments weren’t surrounding the election

Spring Home Show this weekend in Colwood

West Shore Parks and Recreation will be transformed to showcase everything home related

VIDEO: Smokers talk pot rules at annual 4-20 event

Annual pot protest-meets-festival in Vancouver attracted hundreds to vendors, concert

Saanich’s Shew sisters win gold, silver at national wrestling championships

Kiana, 17, won gold while Zena, 14, won silver at nationals

New funds, recruits set to alleviate B.C. sheriff shortage

The Government of British Columbia announced new sheriff graduates, funding for more classes

Video: RCMP investigation gets a deer little photobomb

Princeton RCMP were conducting a drug investigation in Princeton which a deer strolled through

Farnworth says five years too long for feds to deal with organized crime in medical pot

Needs to be dealt with much sooner than that, B.C. Public Safety Minister says

UPDATED: Unions, CP Rail come to agreement, avoiding work stoppage

Locomotive engineers, conductors and signals specialists seeking new collective agreements.

B.C. woman known to hitchhike around province missing

Aislynn Hanson, 18, last seen April 13; known to travel throughout B.C. by hitchhiking

Most Read