Earthquakes cause various forms of damage, such as these cracks on a highway. Esquimalt residents surveyed by Royal Roads University researchers were found to be not as prepared for a disaster as they could be. Black Press file photo

Room for improvement in Esquimalt when it comes to disaster readiness

Royal Roads researchers found residents aged 40 to 49 are most prepared for a disaster

Just two per cent of residents in Esquimalt are considered fully prepared for an earthquake, according to a recent survey conducted by Royal Roads University students in the Disaster Management program.

The results of the survey – to gauge the effectiveness of public education programs – were presented to council just days after the Great BC ShakeOut. That’s when CFB Esquimalt set off a siren issuing a tsunami warning, later calling it an error and retracting the safety warning.

Sara Jansen, Esquimalt emergency program manager, worked with the students and said it’s important that people pay attention to reputable channels in the event of an emergency.

“We do benefit from having the sirens, but it’s important to know that they are not only for tsunamis, they are for any emergency,” Jansen said, before adding that means any emergency on the base.

The survey was conducted over the course of two weeks and saw 152 people answer 27 questions. Jansen said a common problem with emergency programs is collecting baseline data to understand a community’s level of preparedness.

The questions were based on criteria pulled from the province’s 11 elements of earthquake preparedness. Among other findings, the survey determined that age correlates to preparedness; those in the 18 to 29 age group were least prepared for a disaster, while people age 40 to 49 were most prepared.

Overall, 97 per cent of the population has at least started the road to preparedness, while just two per cent are considered fully prepared for any type of disaster.

Nick Bouchard, a Royal Roads masters student who presented the findings to council, agreed with Jansen that the use of CFB Esquimalt sirens to alert and inform the community needs to be demystified.

While just one-third of respondents said they had a family reunification plan in place, 97 per cent said they would help their neighbours in the event of an emergency.

“The incredible sense of community that exists in Esquimalt, it’s something that [you] can be proud of,” Bouchard told council. “It’s a strength that can be leveraged to increase the preparedness of the community.”

The results of the survey align with the strategic goals of the regional emergency management partnership, and the data will now be used to alter that plan regionally.

“Given the interesting events of last Thursday when we all did the great BC ShakeOut,” Desjardins said, “this is valuable information to help staff and council to move forward on how do we ensure our residents are that much more prepared.”

kristyn.anthony@vicnews.com

Just Posted

The shores will not rock in 2019

Atomique Productions announce Rock the Shores festival will not return in 2019, future is uncertain

Tsawout First Nation members opposed to logging on reserve land

Video footage taken from a plane shows an extensive logging operation that… Continue reading

Family still searching for missing Langford man two weeks after disappearance

Family hopeful he is alive, offering $10,000 reward

Victoria police concerned about missing man’s well-being

Delmer was reported missing on March 19

Fracking, economy, climate at centre of Green Party town hall in Metchosin

Green Party leader Elizabeth May and local candidate David Merner take questions from community

Victoria hosts ‘Ultimate Hockey Fan Cave’

The hockey cave was recently featured on a Netflix special

Fire crews battle large blaze at Courtenay hostel

Courtenay Fire Chief Don Bardonnex said nobody was injured

1,300 cruise ship passengers rescued by helicopter amid storm off Norway’s coast

Rescue teams with helicopters and boats were sent to evacuate the cruise ship under extremely difficult circumstances

B.C. university to offer first graduate program on mindfulness in Canada

University of the Fraser Valley says the mostly-online program focuses on self-care and well being

Province announces $18.6 million for B.C. Search and Rescue

The funding, spread over three years, to pay for operations, equipment, and training

Late-season wave of the flu makes its round in B.C.

BC Centre for Disease Control reported 50 per cent jump in flu cases in first weeks of March

Tofino’s housing crisis causing some to seek shelter at the local hospital

Tofino’s housing crisis is pushing the town’s ‘hidden homeless’ population into the forefront.

Sentencing judge in Broncos crash calls for carnage on highways to end

Judge Inez Cardinal sentenced Jaskirat Singh Sidhu to eight years

Wildlife activists slam B.C. business, clubs for ‘wolf-whacking’ contests

Chilcotin Guns, Creston Valley Rod and Gun Club and West Kootenay Outdoorsmen Club under fire

Most Read