Public information sign erected on the church property. (Keri Coles/Oak Bay News)

Oak Bay United Church submits development application

Fate of the affordable housing project will fall to new council

The rezoning application for Oak Bay United Church’s proposed affordable housing project on Granite Street has been submitted to the District of Oak Bay, though the mayor says it will be the next council who decides its fate.

“We are really happy with the design we’ve ended up with,” said Cheryl Thomas, property development committee chair for the project. “We have listened and tried to accommodate everything we possibly could from the community’s suggestions.”

READ: Oak Bay United Church Neighbourhood Housing Project – Rezoning Application

READ: Oak Bay United Church proposed affordable housing project – Summary Plans

At open houses in November, the church showed residents scenarios that ranged from 80 to 150 units in a four- to five-storey building. With feedback from the community and near neighbours, the church settled on a design that has 96 units: 55 to 57 of which are designed to meet government criteria for affordable housing; 35 that are market – affordable units aimed to support those who don’t meet standard government criteria but still need help with affordable homes; and 4 to 6 larger units with up to three bedrooms aimed to support families.

In January, the church had asked for their application to be fast-tracked, but the committee of the whole instead suggested that the best way to save money is to get to a design that will receive the acceptance of council and the community, which would be aided by listening carefully to the community.

RELATED: Oak Bay United to release concept drawing in January

For some, the project presented in the rezoning application submitted Aug.13, didn’t go far enough to address neighbours concerns. Of note, was the amount of parking spots included in the project (53 for the residential units, 50 for the church, and 12 for visitors), the size of the building, and the number of units.

The church conducted a survey during their open house and contracted an independent public opinion polling contractor to conduct an opinion poll by telephone.

The results of the survey, provided by the church, state that 44 per cent of the neighbours to the project were neutral or agreed the project fit the neighbourhood, while 67 per cent of those in Oak Bay who do not neighbour the project were neutral or said it fit. For traffic and parking, the survey shows 50 per cent of neighbours say they are neutral or agree that the design addresses parking and congestion issues, as opposed to 73 per cent of non neighbours.

The public will have an opportunity to speak to this project when it comes before committee of the whole. Mayor Nils Jensen says it is currently with staff and will go to the new council who will be sworn in in early November.

While not currently on the agenda, when it is, it will appear on www.oakbay.ca/municipal-hall/meetings-minutes.

For more information on this project, go to obuchousing.ca.

reporter@oakbaynews.com

Oak Bay United Church

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Public information sign erected on the church property. (Keri Coles/Oak Bay News)

Public information sign erected on the church property. (Keri Coles/Oak Bay News)

Public information sign erected on the Threshold House property, owned by Oak Bay United Church. In the submitted rezoning application this building is to be torn down. (Keri Coles/Oak Bay News)

Neighbours signs suggesting improvements to the project. (Keri Coles/Oak Bay News)

Neighbours signs in opposition to the project. (Keri Coles/Oak Bay News)

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