UVic research engineer Alison Proctor kneels beside a Bluefin-12 AUV (autonomous underwater vehicle) that will be used in the Arctic this summer to help locate the lost ships from the Sir John Franklin expedition in 1845.

UVic launches Arctic search for sunken wreckage of Franklin expedition

A great Canadian mystery could be solved next month, as the University of Victoria joins Parks Canada’s search for the lost ships of Sir John Franklin in the Northwest Passage.

A great Canadian mystery could be solved next month, as the University of Victoria joins Parks Canada’s search for the lost ships of Sir John Franklin in the Northwest Passage.

In 1845, 129 men set sail on the HMS Terror and HMS Erebus to explore the Northwest Passage and find a safe route from Europe to the Orient. The Franklin expedition was meant to last three years but after just 18 months, the vessels disappeared.

On Aug. 9, a three-person engineering and operating team from UVic’s Ocean Technology Lab, along with their autonomous underwater vehicle, the Bluefin-12 will join a crew from Parks Canada to search the waters off Nunavut’s King William Island.

“In cold water like that, these ships are fairly-well preserved, so we hope that there will be a significant amount of them left,” said Alison Proctor, spokesperson for the UVic lab.

Pre-programmed with co-ordinates and monitored during each mission, the $800,000-vehicle will move 100 per cent autonomously when submerged.

“The vehicle is smart enough to know when something’s going wrong and it will surface and let us know that it encountered something,” Proctor said of the Bluefin-12, which usually operates in Saanich Inlet.

“We’re now headed up to completely unfamiliar territory,” she said. “I think we’re all going to be surprised at what is thrown at us and we’re going to have to adapt fairly quickly. It won’t be freezing conditions for the crew to endure, but it will definitely be harsher than we’re used to.”

The search marks Parks Canada’s third attempt at locating Franklin’s ships. In 2010, a Parks Canada research team found the HMS Investigator, one of the vessels that had been searching for the missing Franklin expedition when she sank 155 years ago.

nnorth@saanichnews.com

Just Posted

Horse carriage supporters to rally outside city hall

Owner of carriage company plans rally in response to Coun. Ben Isitt’s motion

UVic science and engineering research gets $18.8 million federal funding boost

Funding for engineering, science, sustainability research

Victoria woman competing for role as Maxim cover model

Winning model gets featured spread in magazine, cash price

Father of Saanich murder victim Lindsay Buziak set to appear on Dr. Phil show Friday

Jeff Buziak says he has not seen the show and does not know what to expect

Greater Victoria wanted list for the week of May 21

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

POLL: Were you satisfied with the Game of Thrones series finale?

Millions gathered in front of their televisions Sunday night to watch the… Continue reading

Raptors beat Bucks 120-102 to even series at 2-2

Lowry pours in 25 as Toronto moves within two games of NBA Finals

Body of missing snowmobiler recovered from Great Slave Lake

Police confirm the body is that of one of three missing snowmobilers

Christmas morning burglar sentenced on Vancouver Island

Justin Redmond Feusse, 20, sentenced to 240 days in jail for Dec. 25 break-and-enter

So, do you know ‘Dave from Vancouver Island’?

Ontario man searching for fellow he travelled with in Europe 50 years ago

Toddler seriously injured after falling from Okanagan balcony

RCMP are investigating after a two-year-old boy fell from the balcony of an apartment in Kelowna

Cost jumps 35% for Trans-Canada Highway widening in B.C.

Revelstoke-area stretch first awarded under new union deal

Most Read