Victoria resident barred from trading securities for fraud

Larry Keith Davis used money from an investor to pay personal bills

The provincial agency regulating securities has barred a Victoria man from the industry and fined him $15,000 for fraud.

Larry Keith Davis received these penalties from a panel of the British Columbia Securities Commission (BCSC) after selling shares in a company that he did not own, then using the investor’s money to pay for personal expenses.

RELATED: Former Olympic rower Harold Backer pleads guilty to fraud

The ruling against Davis stems from events that date to back to June 2011, when he sold 40,000 shares of a company to the investor for $4,000. In April 2012, he sold another 30,000 shares for $3,000. An investigation though revealed that Davis did not own any shares in the company at the time of either investment or at any subsequent time.

“When the investor began asking for her money back in April 2013, Davis repeatedly refused her requests, claiming that her investments were in shares tied to the stock market,” the commission said in a release.

RELATED: Missing Olympian turns himself in to Victoria Police

While the investor never received any shares from Davis, she eventually succeeded received her money through small claim courts — at a considerable cost though.

“While the amount of the fraud in this case and Davis’ enrichment were not substantial, the harm suffered by the investor was significant,” reads the ruling. “She was deprived of her funds for several years and eventually forced to seek recourse to the courts for their recovery. She was also negatively impacted emotionally and testified at the liability hearing that she had not invested since.”

RELATED: Lawsuit seeks restitution from former Olympic Rower

In June 2016, the commission found Davis liable for fraud in the amount of $7,000 contrary to provincial regulations. An appeal by Davis against his life-time ban and penalty for $15,000 failed, leading to the commission’s final ruling.

Its conditions prohibit Davis from any professional dealing in securities, with the proviso that Davis may trade or purchase securities for his own account.

Davis, according to the ruling, attempted but did not complete the educational requirements for working with securities, because he began working in 1987 in a small firm. When authorities interviewed Davis in December 2013 as part of their investigation, Davis told them that he ceased to be active in the industry about one and a half to two years before.


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

wolfgang.depner@saanichnews.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

PHOTOS: Hundreds celebrate Year of the Rat in Victoria’s Chinatown

Lion dancers and kung fu demonstrations on display

Camosun student shares story of overcoming struggles to inspire others

Provincial Tuition Waiver Program helps former youths in care attend post-secondary institutions

Officials reaching out to those in contact with Canada’s first coronavirus patient

The illness has sickened at least 1,975 people and killed 56 in China

Canada’s basketball community mourns Kobe Bryant after helicopter crash

Bryant was an 18-time NBA all-star who won five championships

‘Devastated’: Fans, celebrities remember Kobe Bryant after his death

Bryant played all of his 20-year career with the NBA with the Los Angeles Lakers

Investigation launched after six dead puppies dumped in Richmond hotel parking lot

RAPS reminds people they can always give up puppies they can’t take care of

Canadian Lunar New Year celebrations dampened by coronavirus worries

But Health Minister Patty Hajdu said today that the risk of infection is low

B.C. VIEWS: New coronavirus outbreak an important reminder

Walking the line between cautious and alarmist

Kobe Bryant, daughter killed in California helicopter crash

Bryant entered the NBA draft straight out of high school in 1996

Risk of coronavirus low in B.C. as first case emerges in Toronto: officials

There have been no confirmed cases of the virus in B.C.

Most Read