Nixon Szadkowski, Gracie Szadkowski and Barrett Szadkowski stay active at home while waiting for organized sports to return in Greater Victoria. Multiple sport seasons have been postponed or cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Nick Szadkowski photo)

Nixon Szadkowski, Gracie Szadkowski and Barrett Szadkowski stay active at home while waiting for organized sports to return in Greater Victoria. Multiple sport seasons have been postponed or cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Nick Szadkowski photo)

Sooke youth and coaches stay active from home

Pause during pandemic allows more family time

  • May. 16, 2020 10:00 a.m.

Until organized sports are back in action, Sooke coaches and athletes are striving to keep things in motion.

The coronavirus pandemic has left multiple sport seasons in jeopardy, with hockey season cut short, gyms closed, and soccer and fastball postponed, but coaches are trying to keep their kids active from home.

“We have been doing a lot of bike riding,” said Nick Szadkowski, vice-president of Sooke Minor Hockey. “This feels very unusual for us, as we normally are going to sports all year long.”

Szadkowski has three kids at home and says each year once the hockey season finishes, his daughter transitions into fastball, and his two sons begin lacrosse. Both seasons have been affected.

“I am a little concerned, of course. Particularly that this will carry on into the hockey season,” said Szadkowski. “We have already kind of accepted that fastball and lacrosse will likely not be happening.”

Szadkowski hopes the regular hockey season will pick up as usual the first week of September, but said the decision will be mandated by Hockey Canada.

“I definitely enjoy this little bit of down time, I just hope it’s not for too long,” said Szadkowski, adding he is fortunate to have some property for the kids to get out and explore. “We just brought a new puppy home too so that is keeping them busy.”

ALSO READ: Sooke Minor Fastball looks to salvage season

Justin Wilson, coach of the U16 Sooke Sliders B fastball team, has two kids at home who have been staying active the last couple of months. Wilson’s daughter, Shelby, plays fastball and soccer, and son, Max, plays fastball and hockey.

Normally, Wilson’s family would be spending a lot of time at the ball diamond this time of year, but the pandemic has caused things to look a little bit different for them.

“The kids are still doing school work from home, and with the weather getting better, we get out and do lots of hikes or go biking. It’s important for kids and adults to remain active somehow. In our family, we are lucky to be home a fair bit and keep kids occupied and away from screen time,” said Wilson.

“They have been playing a little bit of catch, practicing fastball at home, but they are just as happy to pick up a basketball or soccer ball, or play road hockey. The options are endless with a driveway and a big bin of sports equipment.”

Wilson has tried to keep a “glass half-full” outlook during the pandemic, noting he is enjoying the extra moments at home with his family.

Sooke boxing coach Ellen Connor closed the Sooke Boxing Club’s doors due to the pandemic, but hopes to reopen in June.

Connor has three kids, two of which are old enough to participate in organized sports. Her son Connor plays ball hockey in the summer and ice hockey in the winter, and her daughter Jill boxes year-round.

“It was a bit of a shock and a routine change in the beginning,” said Connor. “We are so busy as a family, always at the boxing club, and are so sport-minded. So it was definitely weird going from moving at 160 miles per hour, down to 20.”

Connor said living in East Sooke has allowed her and her kids to do a lot of outdoor exploring, and every day they go together on a five kilometre run.

“Jill has hung a heavy bag from a tree and continues to train that way,” said Connor. “It’s just different, but I believe it’s a challenge to change our perspectives, and still make things happen.”

She noted that this situation won’t last forever, so she is happy to take a pause and slow down for a while. However, this pause doesn’t mean Connor and the kids are pausing from physical activity.

“When you sweat, or work out, endorphin’s are released and people need that to feel good. Getting outside and moving is so important, and I think for people who maybe thought they didn’t have time for it in their lives before, can have that time now,” said Connor.

“Yes the pandemic is awful, but I think a lot of good things can come from this. A worldwide pause, to stop and smell the roses, appreciate what we have, and make ourselves busy in a healthier way.”

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A man was issued a $230 fine after refusing to wear a mask inside a Central Saanich business. (Central Saanich Police Services/Twitter)
Man issued fine after refusing to mask up in Central Saanich business

$230 ticket issued under the COVID-19 Related Measures Act

Aragon Properties’ proposed development for the corner of Cook and Pendergast streets in Cook Street Village was voted down by Victoria city council on Thursday night after a public hearing. (File contributed/ City of Victoria)
Lack of affordable housing spells end for Cook Street Village project in Victoria

Council narrowly defeats proposal for four-storey building on former Pic-A-Flic Video site

A report by investigator Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond found “widespread systemic racism against Indigenous people” in a report released Monday.
Peninsula hospital one where ‘significant work underway’

Investigation finds ‘widespread systemic racism against Indigenous people’ in provincial health care

Victoria police issued tickets to two Victoria party hosts Saturday night, according to VicPD Chief Del Manak. (Unsplash)
Victoria partiers hid in closets, bedrooms in an attempt to avoid fines

Police gave out COVID-19 tickets to two separate parties

(Courtesy of West Shore RCMP)
Second driver facing impaired charges after View Royal traffic stop leads to loaded firearms

West Shore RCMP stop swerving motorist and Saanich woman who came to pick her up

A B.C. Ambulance Service paramedic wearing a face mask to curb the spread of COVID-19 moves a stretcher outside an ambulance at Royal Columbia Hospital, in New Westminster, B.C., on Sunday, November 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. records deadliest weekend of COVID-19 pandemic with 46 deaths; more than 2,300 cases

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry provides COVID-19 update

Black Press Media and BraveFace have come together to support children facing life-threatening conditions. Net proceeds from these washable, reusable, three-layer masks go to Make-A-Wish Foundation BC & Yukon.
Put on a BraveFace: Help make children’s wishes come true

Black Press Media, BraveFace host mask fundraiser for Make-A-Wish Foundation

Christy Jordan-Fenton is the co-author of the book Fatty Legs, which has been mentioned amid the controversy of an Abbotsford school assignment on residential schools.
Fatty Legs co-author responds to Abbotsford class assignment on residential schools

Children’s book mentioned amid controversy at W. A. Fraser Middle School

Kootenay East MLA Tom Shypitka takes over as energy and mines critic for the B.C. Liberal opposition. Kelowna-Lake Country MLA Norm Letnick (right) moves from health critic to assistant deputy speaker. (Hansard TV)
B.C. Liberals pick critics to take on Horgan’s NDP majority

Interim leader Shirley Bond takes seniors, long-term care

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance Chrystia Freeland listens to a question from a reporter on the phone during a news conference in Ottawa, Monday, Nov. 30, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Spending too little worse than spending too much, Freeland says as Canada’s deficit tops $381B

‘The risk of providing too little support now outweighs that of providing too much’

Left to right: A screenshot of NTC nurse navigator Lesley Cerney, FNHA regional mental health manager Georjeana Paterson and Island Health’s medical health officer Dr. Charmaine Enns addressing Ehattesaht community members from Ehatis reserve in a Facebook live update. (Ehattesaht First Nation/Facebook)
Medical team sent to Ehatis reserve near Zeballos to guide community through COVID outbreak

17 cases, eight recoveries and no hospitalizations as Island Health praises First Nation’s response

Still from a video surveillance camera of a man alleged to have stolen from several people at knife-point in Chilliwack (Rosedale) early on Nov. 28, 2020. (Facebook)
B.C. man defends his family against intruder, saves neighbour while wielding hockey stick

RCMP looking for footage that captures violent crime spree in Chilliwack

Harbour seals rest on log booms at Flavelle Mill in Port Hardy. With recent announcements the mill will be getting rid of the log booms, Dr. David Rosen sees an opportunity to study how the disappearance of this highly-frequented refuge for the seals will alter their behaviour in Burrard Inlet. (Photo supplied by David Rosen)
What the heck is going on with marine mamals in Vancouver waterways?

UBC researcher asks why they’re returning, and what role we’re playing

Jim Neufeld, 55, was last seen leaving his home in Penticton Jan. 21, 2009. (RCMP photo)
Human remains found off U.S. coast in 2009 identified as Penticton man

Jim Neufeld, 55, was last seen leaving his home in Penticton Jan. 21, 2009

Most Read