A recent B.C. Supreme Court order has prohibited Christopher James Pritchard from practising law by appearing as counsel or drafting legal documents. (YouTube/A Warrior Calls)

A recent B.C. Supreme Court order has prohibited Christopher James Pritchard from practising law by appearing as counsel or drafting legal documents. (YouTube/A Warrior Calls)

‘Expert’ of fighting COVID-19 restrictions in court barred from acting as lawyer in B.C.

Christopher James Pritchard has been shut out from practising law or referring to himself as a lawyer

An Ontario man who claims he can help people fight COVID-19 regulations in court using principles from the 10 commandments has been shut out of acting as a lawyer in B.C.

Released June 24, the B.C. Supreme Court order prohibits Christopher James Pritchard from practising law by appearing as counsel or drafting legal documents. He’s also been barred from referring to himself as a lawyer or issuing court claims.

As it stands, the self-proclaimed “common law expert” has not completed law school nor passed the bar examination, a qualification required for Canadian legal professionals.

However, on his A Warrior Calls website, Pritchard describes himself as a “counselor at law” and details the few defendants he has provided counsel to using biblical precepts.

Previously, Pritchard’s arguments have been struck down by the courts but have gained acclaim among those who subscribe to COVID-19 conspiracy theories.

READ ALSO: B.C. woman reports park tussle with anti-masker

In a Nov. 8, 2020, live stream, Pritchard explains his pseudolaw beliefs to followers:

“People from a society that you do not belong to called the bar push paperwork across you, in a public courthouse or in private, they are compromising your consciousness.”

He says “the majority of lawyers have just spent eight years being indoctrinated. They are taught processes so they can continue this massive fraud, They are not taught law.”

Pritchard uses the term “C-19” to describe COVID-19 as he says he does not like using the proper term for the pandemic virus.

The only way he’ll be able to speak out in courtroom proceedings now is if Pritchard chooses to represent himself in court, acting without counsel.

READ ALSO: Religious B.C. man lodges human rights complaint after fired for refusing to wear a mask



sarah.grochowski@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Want to support local journalism? Make a donation here.

BC Supreme CourtCoronavirusCourt