Sandra Richardson, CEO of the Victoria Foundation, makes the crowd of hundreds laugh at the launch of the Vital Signs report early Tuesday morning, with a story about meeting a man on the Johnson street bridge who was also on his way to the event and hoped there would be good breakfast served. (Kendra Crighton/News Staff)

Hundreds attend Victoria Foundation’s breakfast launch of Vitals Sign report

Leaving a waiting list to get in the room

A breakfast, held to launch the Victoria Foundation’s Vital Signs annual report, drew hundreds of people to the Grand Pacific Hotel early Tuesday morning, leaving a waiting list of people to get into the room.

With 14 years of history behind it, Vital Signs brings data to life to affect change in our community by bringing together the voices of 1,695 people living in Greater Victoria.

The report highlights 12 key issues that citizens were asked to give a letter grade, along with three aspects of the issue that are currently working well and three priorities for improvement.

RELATED: Happiness rates high in Greater Victoria: Vital Signs report

A survey at the beginning of the event showed 41 per cent of the people in attendance worked in the non-profit sector, 31 per cent worked in business and 18 per cent worked in government, the other 10 per cent were retired or other.

The data in the report is vital to all these sectors, along with many more, by breaking down local statistics into easy to understand snippets of information.The Vital Signs report is used by community leaders to help guide decision making in the community.

RELATED: Vital Signs report breaks down Greater Victoria statistics

Mandy Farmer, CEO of Accent Inns and Hotel Zed, stated she relied on the report to keep her informed on the wide range of issues affecting her employees’ quality of life and to help gauge how she can best contribute to their well-being. Jean McRae, CEO of the Inter-Cultural Association of Greater Victoria, stated her team references the report when developing programming and proposals, adding that they share relevant data with funders and policy makers to help them understand what is happening for newcomers and the community.

Other areas of interest in the report include a look at what Victoria and Canada would look like if reduced down to only 100 people, a snapshot of the quality of life in Greater Victoria and detailed information on safety, transportation and the local economy, plus many more topics.

To read the entire report visit victoriafoundation.bc.ca.



kendra.crighton@blackpress.ca

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