Increased speed limit signs are installed on Highway 97c in 2014. (Black Press files)

Speed limits being reduced on 15 B.C. highways

Increased limits in 2014 showed increase in serious crashes

The B.C. government is lowering speed limits on 15 sections of B.C. highway that have shown an increase in collisions.

Transportation Minister Claire Trevena said the data show a clear link between increased speed limits and serious crashes on some highways.

“By rolling back speed limits slightly, our goal is to reduce accidents, keep roads open and protect the lives of British Columbians,” Trevena said.

The ministry says speed limit changes are beginning immediately and, weather permitting, they will be complete this week. A total of 339 signs are being changed.

Highways with reduced speed limits are:

• Highway 1: Cowichan Bay to Nanaimo – 90 km/h to 80 km/h

• Highway 1: Whatcom Road to Hope – 110 km/h to 100 km/h

• Highway 1: Boston Bar to Jackass Mountain – 100 km/h to 90 km/h

• Highway 1: Tobiano to Savona – 100 km/h to 90 km/h

• Highway 1: Chase to Sorrento – 100 km/h to 90 km/h

• Highway 3: Sunday Summit to Princeton – 90 km/h to 80 km/h

• Highway 7: Agassiz to Hope – 100 km/h to 90 km/h

• Highway 19: Parksville to Campbell River – 120 km/h to 110 km/h

• Highway 19: Bloedel to Sayward – 100 km/h to 90 km/h

• Highway 97A: Grindrod to Sicamous – 90 km/h to 80 km/h

• Highway 97C: Merritt to Aspen Grove – 110 km/h to 100 km/h

• Highway 97C: Aspen Grove to Peachland – 120 km/h to 110 km/h

• Highway 99: Horseshoe Bay to Squamish – 90 km/h to 80 km/h

• Highway 99: Squamish to Whistler – 100 km/h to 90 km/h

• Highway 99: Whistler to Pemberton – 90 km/h to 80 km/h

RELATED: Study shows increase in crashes, fatalities

Speed limits on 33 segments totalling 1,300 kilometres of rural provincial highways were raised in July 2014, and a maximum of 120 km/h was instituted.

The maximum was applied to the Coquihalla Highway from Hope to Kamloops, the Okanagan Connector (Highway 97C) from Aspen Grove to Peachland and Highway 19 from Parksville to Campbell River.

The Sea-to-Sky Highway was increased from 80 to 90 km/h from Horseshoe Bay to Squamish. Other increases were 80 to 100 km/h on Highway 3 from Manning Park West to Allison Pass, 90 to 100 km/h from Revelstoke to Golden and 100 to 110 km/h on Highway 97C from Merritt to Aspen Grove.

After analysis of the first year’s data, speed limits were rolled back on two sections in 2016. They were Highway 1 from Hope to Boston Bar and Highway 5A east of Princeton.


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

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